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I'm trying to understand how to use C++(11) <type_traits>.

Here's my trivial test program

#include <type_traits>

template<class U, class S>
inline U add(typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value,U>::type a,
             typename std::enable_if<std::is_signed  <S>::value,S>::type b)
{
    return a + b;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[], const char * envp[])
{
    unsigned int ui;
    int i;
    auto a = add(ui, i);
    return 0;
}

When compiled with GCC 4.8.1 it errors as

/home/per/f.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**, const char**)’:
/home/per/f.cpp:15:23: error: no matching function for call to ‘add(unsigned int&, int&)’
     auto a = add(ui, i);
                       ^
/home/per/f.cpp:15:23: note: candidate is:
/home/per/f.cpp:5:10: note: template<class U, class S> U add(typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value, U>::type, typename std::enable_if<std::is_signed<S>::value, S>::type)
 inline U add(typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value,U>::type a,
          ^
/home/per/f.cpp:5:10: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
/home/per/f.cpp:15:23: note:   couldn't deduce template parameter ‘U’
     auto a = add(ui, i);
                       ^

I have no clue why GCC can't deduce the template parameter U. Anybody knows what information my code is missing, that is how I write a program in C++11 that takes a unsigned integral type as first argument and signed integral type as second?

share|improve this question
    
You cannot decuce types left of a qualifying ::. – Kerrek SB Jun 7 '13 at 14:18
    
14.8.2.5 Deducing template arguments from a type [temp.deduct.type] 5 The non-deduced contexts are: — The nested-name-specifier of a type that was specified using a qualified-id. – TemplateRex Jun 7 '13 at 14:28
    
Thanks for all nice comments and answers! – Nordlöw Jun 7 '13 at 14:43
up vote 11 down vote accepted

typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value,U>::type is not a deducible context. In order to deduce U from this the compiler would need the ability to apply the reverse operation of std::enable_if. It doesn't look too hard, that's true, but that's because you are talking about a simple thing like enable_if. It would be impossible to require this of every trait, so C++ just plays it cool and does not make any kind of weird rule exceptions: it's not deducible in general, it's not deducible in this one.

You can do it this way instead:

template<class U, class S,
         EnableIf<std::is_unsigned<U>, std::is_signed<S>>...>
         // see http://flamingdangerzone.com/cxx11/2012/06/01/almost-static-if.html
U add(U a, S b)

Or in compilers that don't support that style properly you can just add an extra defaulted argument:

template<class U, class S>
U add(U a, S b,
      typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value
          && std::is_signed<S>::value,void>::type* = nullptr)

... or messing up with the return type.

template<class U, class S>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value
    && std::is_signed<S>::value,U>::type
add(U a, S b)
share|improve this answer
    
wow... What is THIS doing? typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value && std::is_signed<S>::value,void>::type* = nullptr. rvalue to pointer? – BЈовић Jun 10 '13 at 6:11

You are not giving the compiler a chance to deduce U and S. You can rewrite your function as follows, and move the SFINAE checks in the template parameter list:

template<class U, class S,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value &&
                            std::is_signed  <S>::value
        >::type* = nullptr>
inline U add(U a, S b)
{
    return a + b;
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer

You first have to deduce the types before you can reason about the types!

It should be:

template <typename U, typename S>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value &&
                        std::is_signed<S>::value>, U>::type
add(U u, S s)
{
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

It's not possible to deduce a template parameter from a "nested typedef" expression. That is, it's possible to deduce U from some_template<U>, but not from some_template<U>::type.

The compiler cannot possibly enumerate all (infinite!) instantiations of some_template and see for which of them the nested typedef equals the actual argument type.

share|improve this answer

Try:

template<class U, class S>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<U>::value && std::is_signed<S>,U>::type  
add(U a , S b)
{
    return a + b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Personally, i prefer to write enable_if at the return type, because this makes function declaration much clear. And, in addition, makes template deduction work (As in your case). – Manu343726 Jun 7 '13 at 14:32
    
Avoid the use of the inline keyword. C++ compiler inlines every functions if it thinks is more efficient. Even if you have writed inline or not. And, even you puts inline, if the compiler thinks that inline that function is not efficient, it won't inline the function. So, not write inline. You are not better optimizer than the compiler. Write simple and clear code and let the compiler do its job. – Manu343726 Jun 8 '13 at 9:46

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