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I don't want to write my own because i'm afraid i might miss something and/or rip off other people's work, so is there an ObjectPool (or similar) class existing in a library for .NET?

By object pool, i mean a class that assists caching of objects that take a long time to create, generally used to improve performance.

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1  
Perhaps you could describe what you expect this ObjectPool to do for you? –  Matthew Scharley Nov 9 '09 at 2:02
4  
I believe en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_pool is a perfect description. –  RCIX Nov 9 '09 at 2:05
    
instead of a wiki link, please update your question with a description of what you want an ObjectPool to do. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 9 '09 at 2:07
    
Added, though the link still applies. –  RCIX Nov 9 '09 at 2:11
    
This is the best ever object pool on c# with explanation and example. Works even on windows phone stackoverflow.com/questions/2510975/… –  Alex Sorokoletov Apr 4 '13 at 20:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

UPDATE:

I'd also put forward BufferBlock<T> from TPL DataFlow. IIRC it's part of .net now. The great thing about BufferBlock<T> is that you can wait asynchronously for items to become available using the Post<T> and ReceiveAsync<T> extension methods. Pretty handy in an async/await world.

ORIGINAL ANSWER

A while back I faced this problem and came up with a lightweight (rough'n'ready) threadsafe (I hope) pool that has proved very useful, reusable and robust:

    public class Pool<T> where T : class
    {
        private readonly Queue<AsyncResult<T>> asyncQueue = new Queue<AsyncResult<T>>();
        private readonly Func<T> createFunction;
        private readonly HashSet<T> pool;
        private readonly Action<T> resetFunction;

        public Pool(Func<T> createFunction, Action<T> resetFunction, int poolCapacity)
        {
            this.createFunction = createFunction;
            this.resetFunction = resetFunction;
            pool = new HashSet<T>();
            CreatePoolItems(poolCapacity);
        }

        public Pool(Func<T> createFunction, int poolCapacity) : this(createFunction, null, poolCapacity)
        {
        }

        public int Count
        {
            get
            {
                return pool.Count;
            }
        }

        private void CreatePoolItems(int numItems)
        {
            for (var i = 0; i < numItems; i++)
            {
                var item = createFunction();
                pool.Add(item);
            }
        }

        public void Push(T item)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Push-ing null item. ERROR");
                throw new ArgumentNullException();
            }
            if (resetFunction != null)
            {
                resetFunction(item);
            }
            lock (asyncQueue)
            {
                if (asyncQueue.Count > 0)
                {
                    var result = asyncQueue.Dequeue();
                    result.SetAsCompletedAsync(item);
                    return;
                }
            }
            lock (pool)
            {
                pool.Add(item);
            }
        }

        public T Pop()
        {
            T item;
            lock (pool)
            {
                if (pool.Count == 0)
                {
                    return null;
                }
                item = pool.First();
                pool.Remove(item);
            }
            return item;
        }

        public IAsyncResult BeginPop(AsyncCallback callback)
        {
            var result = new AsyncResult<T>();
            result.AsyncCallback = callback;
            lock (pool)
            {
                if (pool.Count == 0)
                {
                    lock (asyncQueue)
                    {
                        asyncQueue.Enqueue(result);
                        return result;
                    }
                }
                var poppedItem = pool.First();
                pool.Remove(poppedItem);
                result.SetAsCompleted(poppedItem);
                return result;
            }
        }

        public T EndPop(IAsyncResult asyncResult)
        {
            var result = (AsyncResult<T>) asyncResult;
            return result.EndInvoke();
        }
    }

In order to avoid any interface requirements of the pooled objects, both the creation and resetting of the objects is performed by user supplied delegates: i.e.

Pool<MemoryStream> msPool = new Pool<MemoryStream>(() => new MemoryStream(2048), pms => {
        pms.Position = 0;
        pms.SetLength(0);
    }, 500);

In the case that the pool is empty, the BeginPop/EndPop pair provide an APM (ish) means of retrieving the object asynchronously when one becomes available (using Jeff Richter's excellent AsyncResult<TResult> implementation).

I can't quite remember why it is constained to T : class... there's probably none.

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Why exactly would you use a HashSet? –  Dan Tao Nov 9 '09 at 4:04
    
y'see, that code is now released under a CC-Wiki license so i can't use it without releasing my code under that license, and i'm not sure that i want to do that... –  RCIX Nov 9 '09 at 4:16
    
I don't understand how the proposed solution is related to the question. It seems like a fancy Queue rather than a ObjectsPool. –  Boris Lipschitz Nov 9 '09 at 4:29
    
You could use it as inspiration for your ObjectPool, rather than directly copy it. –  Alastair Pitts Nov 9 '09 at 4:33
    
When I see code like this, I just kind of "drool" thinking about how much I don't understand it, and would like to understand it :) And, one day, perhaps, I will. Yes, I voted the message up. thanks, –  BillW Nov 9 '09 at 5:51

In the upcoming version of .NET (4.0), there's a ConcurrentBag<T> class which can easily be utilized in an ObjectPool<T> implementation; in fact the there's an article on MSDN that shows you how to do precisely this.

If you don't have access to the latest .NET framework, you can get the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace (which has ConcurrentBag<T>) in .NET 3.5 from Microsoft's Reactive Extensions (Rx) library (in System.Threading.dll).

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CodeProject has a sample ObjectPool implementation. Have a look here. Alternatively, there are some implementations here, here, and here.

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How about System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary?

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2  
While a dictionary might be used in an object pool implementation, it doesn't offer any of the features (such as a strategy for satisfying requests when the pool is empty), except storage. –  Jeff Sternal Nov 9 '09 at 2:23
    
It's usually, straight forward to add a "Factory" support as well as multithreading. The Pool might preload the objects on start (e.g from database) or create them on fly when requested. The full design of such class depends on your requirements. –  Boris Lipschitz Nov 9 '09 at 2:31

Sounds like you need a Factory pattern with caching.

You can try use .net reflector to look at the ThreadPool implementation.

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