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I have written a function with variable argument list

void cvShowMatImages( char* title, int nArgs, ...)  // Mat Images

where the argument to pass are openCV images. I have actually 2 different functions for the 2 image formats IplImage and Mat, the above mentioned and a second one

void cvShowIplImages( char* title, int nArgs, ...)  // Ipl Images

But I cannot mix images of the 2 types. I could resolve my issue if I would be able to determine the type of argument passed, but I do not know how to do. This is how I read the argument:

// Get the images passed as arguments
va_list args;
// Initialize the variable argument list
va_start( args, nArgs );
// Loop on each image
for ( int num = 0; num < nArgs; num++ )
{
   // Get the image to be copied from the argument list
   srcImg = va_arg( args, Mat );
   ...

and for IplImage:

srcImg = va_arg( args, IplImage* );

In both case srcImg is declared as

Mat srcImg

since there is an overloaded operator= for IplImage. Is there a way to solve this issue?

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2  
Sounds like a perfect use-case for variadic templates (well, in the end every use of good (bad?) old ellipses is a perfect use-case for them). –  Christian Rau Jun 7 '13 at 15:20
1  
Variable arguments aren't typesafe. –  Kerrek SB Jun 7 '13 at 15:25
    
@ChristianRau: Why did you remove the C tag? –  alk Jun 7 '13 at 15:32
    
@alk Because I would wonder how you would make sense out of things like cv::Mat and operator= in C code. Both are completely different languages (sad truth: there is no "C/C++") and you have to decide for one, which the OP did when using cv::Mat. –  Christian Rau Jun 7 '13 at 15:36
    
@ChristianRau: Ups ... I obviously missed the OP's last line. –  alk Jun 7 '13 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

I'd rather consider passing tuple or array or a vector.

As std::array is template with N, it is possible to make your function a template with N too, and implement in a generic way. Variadic template is also viable if your complier is good for it.

The ... is something we try to get rid of. It's undefined behavior to pass anything non-POD, and no type check is possible. What makes it way too prone to errors. For your case it is not very helpful either.

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Using variadic templates in this manner is a possible solution:

#include <iostream>

template<typename... Args> void func(double t, Args... args) ;
template<typename... Args> void func(int t, Args... args) ;

void func(int t) 
{
    std::cout << "int: "<< t << std::endl ;
}

void func(double t) 
{
    std::cout << "double: "<< t << std::endl ;
}

template<typename... Args>
void func(double t, Args... args) 
{
    func(t) ;
    func(args...) ;
}

template<typename... Args>
void func(int t, Args... args) 
{
    func(t) ;
    func(args...) ;
}


int main()
{
    int x1 = 1, x2 = 5 ;
    double d1 = 2.5 , d2 = 3.5;

    func( x1 , d1, x2 ) ;
    func( x1 , d1, d2 ) ;
} 

It is not very elegant but it may help solve your problem. Another method would be to use two std::initializer_list one for each type, like so:

#include <iostream>
#include <initializer_list>

void func2( std::initializer_list<int> listInt, std::initializer_list<double> listDouble )
{
    for( auto elem : listInt )
    {
        std::cout << "Int: " << elem << std::endl ;
    }

    for( auto elem : listDouble )
    {
        std::cout << "double: " << elem << std::endl ;
    }
}

int main()
{
    func2( {10, 20, 30, 40 }, {2.5, 2.5 }) ;    
} 
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First of all I thank you all for your contribution!

I have not a C++11 compliant compiler, so some of your proposals won´t be working.

Anyway, I have found a rather simple solution - which I never thought to be working! - which is just casting the argument containing an IplImage to Mat!

example:

cvShowMatImages( "all my Ipl and Mat images", 2, myMatImage, (Mat)myIplImage );
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