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I've a web page with this part of HTML code:

<meta property="og:type" content="photo" />
    <meta property="og:description" content="descrizione">

    <meta property="og:site_name" content="Site_Name" />
    <meta property="og:title" content="" />
    <meta property="og:image" content="http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.jpg" />
    <meta property="og:determiner" content="a" />
    <meta property="fb:app_id" content="124024574287414" />
    <meta property="og:url" content="http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.com" />

How can I pick the content of the property="og:image"? I need to get that link to show it in my app.

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closed as not a real question by Nasreddine, Andrew Barber Jun 9 '13 at 11:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You want to parse it using C#? On the server-side? –  rae1 Jun 7 '13 at 16:23
    
Take a look at at the Html Agility pack for parsing Html in C# htmlagilitypack.codeplex.com –  Richard Jun 7 '13 at 16:25
    
Should be a comment... –  EZI Jun 7 '13 at 16:38
    
Even closed, it is polite to mark the best answer. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 20 '13 at 15:27

3 Answers 3

Using HtmlAgilityPack

HtmlAgilityPack.HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlAgilityPack.HtmlDocument();
doc.LoadHtml(html);

var props = doc.DocumentNode.Descendants("meta")
            .ToDictionary( m => m.Attributes["property"].Value,
                            m => m.Attributes["content"].Value);

Console.WriteLine(props["og:image"]);
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If there's any two meta tags with the same property, this code will bomb. –  Shlomo Jun 7 '13 at 18:15
    
@Shlomo Yes, an html page containing multiple meta tags with the same property name deserves this. –  I4V Jun 7 '13 at 18:22
    
The page deserves it, and the developer of the page does as well. But the developer of the parser may not. –  Shlomo Jun 7 '13 at 18:36
    
@Shlomo Then OP can simply replace ToDictionary with ToLookup :) –  I4V Jun 7 '13 at 18:39

Here's the no-fail way to do it.

  1. I am not a fan of third party libraries to solve a little problem. No offense to the agility pack, by the way. It's super great and powerful. You never want to parse HTML on your own. But this is such a little edge case! Why screw with it?
  2. You can't be sure the HTML will parse, so you need something else. XML is tempting but unless you are 100% positive this is valid XHTML (which nothing really is anymore) it's better to not do chase it. Just treat this as a string parsing exercise.

And what parses strings best? Regular Expressions, that's what.

Here's your solution:

var s = @"
<meta property=""og:type"" content=""photo"" />
<meta property=""og:description"" content=""descrizione"">
<meta property=""og:site_name"" content=""Site_Name"" />
<meta property=""og:title"" content="""" />
<meta property=""og:image"" content=""http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.jpg"" />
<meta property=""og:determiner"" content=""a"" />
<meta property=""fb:app_id"" content=""124024574287414"" />
<meta property=""og:url"" content=""http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.com"" />";

// first define what you will look for using regex pattern syntax
var p = @"meta\s{1,}property=""og:image""\s{1,}content=""(.+)""\s{0,}/>";

// second let the regex engine use your pattern against your html string
var m = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Match(s, p);

// third pull out just the part you want from the resulting match
var g = m.Groups[1];

// forth get the value from the meta tag, specifically the og:image you wanted
var i = g.Value;

Yep, it's that easy. And Regex makes it more reliable, too.

Best of luck!

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Code to set up HtmlDocument:

var s = @"
<meta property=""og:type"" content=""photo"" />
<meta property=""og:description"" content=""descrizione"">

<meta property=""og:site_name"" content=""Site_Name"" />
<meta property=""og:title"" content="""" />
<meta property=""og:image"" content=""http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.jpg"" />
<meta property=""og:determiner"" content=""a"" />
<meta property=""fb:app_id"" content=""124024574287414"" />
<meta property=""og:url"" content=""http://addfsfdbyhdfsifd.com"" />";

HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlDocument();
doc.LoadHtml(s);

Find the node, get the attribute.

var node = doc.DocumentNode.SelectNodes("//meta[@property='og:image']").FirstOrDefault();

var content = node != null
    ? node.GetAttributeValue("content", string.Empty)
    : string.Empty;
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1  
XPath? WHAT? Why are you still using XPath? –  It'sNotALie. Jun 7 '13 at 16:44
    
Because it works. –  Shlomo Jun 7 '13 at 17:21
    
It works, yes. Is it readable? No. Is there better ways to do it? Yes. –  It'sNotALie. Jun 7 '13 at 17:26
    
Feel free to provide a better, more readable answer. –  Shlomo Jun 7 '13 at 17:36
    
I disagree; I dig xPath. Elegant and powerful. If you know it you can read it. If you don't know it, of course it's difficult. Duh. Lambdas, Regex, F# - what you don't know is always challenging.That argument is silliness. Having said that, most HTML documents won't parse into an XmlDocument. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 8 '13 at 2:24

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