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I'm developing a small progran. I use Qt for the GUI. I have 2 Forms / Classes. MainWindow and AddProductDialog.

There is a variable (a std::string to be exact) which I need in both of them. I need to define it in an Event of AddProductDialog (e.g. std::string decl = "";) and I need to use the value of it in a function of my MainWindow.

I thought I could place this variable in a header file which each of them will include but apparently it doesn't work.

Now it works but I don't think that's a good style. I declared and defined it in my main.cpp.

main.cpp :

//includes ...
...

std::string descr; //The variable I need

int main(){ /* blah blah */ }

MainWindow.cpp :

void MainWindow::on_AddProductOptions_clicked()
{
    extern std::string descr;
    AddProductDialog *adp = new AddProductDialog(this);
    adp->setModal(true);

    if(adp->exec() == QDialog::Accepted)
        _Description = descr; //_Description is a private variable of my MainWindow Class
}

AddProduct.cpp

void AddProductDialog::on_cmdOkay_clicked()
{
    extern std::string descr;
    descr = "";
    done(QDialog::Accepted);
}

This works of course. But is there a way to declare this variable in a header and include it so I can use it?

I tried something like this at first but it always caused an error :

header

//include guard
extern std::string descr;
//include guard

mainwindow

//include header
//...
std::string descr = "";
//...

addproductdialog

//include header
//...
extern std::string descr;
descr = "whatever";
share|improve this question
    
I just read it again and noticed it's hard to understand the question. I wanna know where I should place it and if there's a way how to declare the variable in a header. –  Davlog Jun 7 '13 at 16:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In my guidelines you're strictly forbidden to use extern declaration in an implementation file. Either in function block or namespace scope.

Externs must appear in a .h file that is included by client and the file that defines it. That makes it easier to discover discrepancy in type or attributes. Also allows easier maintenance, as you limit redundancy to a single instance.

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I'm not sure I understand your problem very well, but couldn't you just make descr a private member of addproductdialog, have a getter for the mainwindow to read it once the dialog ends and is accepted?

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This sounds like an excellent solution! –  Mats Petersson Jun 7 '13 at 16:27
    
This is also a good solution. Thanks. –  Davlog Jun 7 '13 at 19:36

You treat the header file and the corresponding source file as a module that implements somethings. Per convention you name them similar, e.g. MainWindow.h and MainWindow.cpp.

You should add an extern declaration in the header file for each variable that is defined in that module and shall be public visible to other modules. Every module that needs to know the type or the instance name of the variable just includes the required header file. Or course the implemention source includes its own header file.

Example:

MainWindow.h

class MainWindow
{
    public:
        void on_AddProductOptions_clicked();
};

extern MainWindow mainWindow;

AddProduct.h

class AddProductDialog 
{
    public:
        void on_CommandOkay_Clicked();
};

extern AddProductDialog addProductDialog;

SomeCommonDataIDontHaveANameFor.h

// If header files should include system header files or not is discussed elsewhere.
// I add this here to allow compiling of the sample code.
#include <string>

extern std::string descr;

SomeCommonDataIDontHaveANameFor.cpp

#include "SomeCommonDataIDontHaveANameFor.h"

std::string descr;

main.cpp

#include "MainWindow.h"
#include "AddProduct.h"
#include "SomeCommonDataIDontHaveANameFor.h"

int main(void)
{
    mainWindow.on_AddProductOptions_Clicked();
    addProductDialog.on_CommandOkay_Clicked();
}

MainWindow.cpp

#include "MainWindow.h"

AddProductDialog addProductDialog;

// add implemetation of AddProductDialog class

The variable addProductDialog is defined extern in the header file. When the compiler processes the compilation unit MainWindow.cpp it first "sees" it as extern declaration later it gets the actual definition. That's no problem at all and there is no need to fiddle with preprocessor constructs like compilation unit specific defines.

I don't know how the variable descr is related to all the code in your program. You will find a better names for the files. Therefore I choosed intentionally an ugly file name to encourage to use a better one.

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This:

 descr = "whatever";

must be within a function or as an initializer where the function is defined.

And I would put the extern std::string descr; in a header file. The definition can go wherever you feel it "belongs".

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You can do this.

In the header file

/* header.h */
MYEXTERN std::string descr;

In main.cpp

/* MYEXTERN doesn't evaluate to anything, so var gets defined here */
#define MYEXTERN 
#include "header.h"

In the other .cpp files

/* MYEXTERN evaluates to extern, so var gets externed in all other CPP files */
#define MYEXTERN extern
#include "header.h"

So it gets defined in only one .cpp file & gets externed in all the others.

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1  
This approach is just unusable. Consider two compilation units A and B. A defines a callback interface that is used in B. B defines an interfaces that is used in A. That's no problen in C++ since you can use forward declarations. What MYEXTERN schould be in A.cpp and B.cpp?? There is no sensible answer. –  harper Jun 7 '13 at 17:30
    
@harper - I am not sure I understand your point - this approach is specially for variables. –  user93353 Jun 7 '13 at 23:09
    
So when you have controllers for module type A..K you would write in a client module #define MYEXTERNA .. #define MYEXTERNI #define MYEXTERNK #include "modA.h" .. #include "modI.h" #include "modK.h" when you use each controllers variable? You would need each MYEXTERNx, wouldn't you? How do you work with circular dependencies? –  harper Jun 8 '13 at 5:15
    
@harper - The answer is specifically for the question the OP asked - and it will solve his problem. All the other issues you raised can easily be handled - please post a question about how to handle it if you want to know - it's very difficult to write answers in comments. –  user93353 Jun 8 '13 at 5:55

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