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I would like new lines and indents shown in this output

$a = array(1,2,3,4);
print_r($a);

So instead of this:

Array ( [0] => 1 [1] => 2 [2] => 3 [3] => 4 )

I would get something like this:

Array ( 
  [0] => 1 
  [1] => 2 
  [2] => 3 
  [3] => 4
  )
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest using HTML's <pre> tag (preformatting):

echo "<pre>";print_r($a);echo"</pre>";

EDIT:

To concatenate the output, you must set the second parameter of print_r to true to return the value rather than echoing it:

echo "<pre>" . print_r($a,true) . "</pre>";
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all good answers, this one was first, thanks guys. –  Ziarno Jun 7 '13 at 16:56
1  
If you use this concatenated output, I believe you need that second parameter. It returns the value rather than echoing it: echo "<pre>" . print_r($a,true) . "</pre>"; My original answer didn't need it, but this one does. –  showdev Jun 7 '13 at 17:00

By using the HTML <pre> tag. Also remember to pass true as a second argument to print_r()

echo '<pre>' . htmlentities(print_r($a, true)) . '</pre>';

Also as @cHao points out, if you happen any <pre> tags within the data, you'll need to pass the result through htmlentities() or htmlspecialchars().

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2  
Note that if the result happens to have </pre> in it (or apparently any other HTML, for that matter), this goes all to hell. I'd recommend HTML-encoding the output. –  cHao Jun 7 '13 at 16:36
    
@cHao Good point, added to answer :) –  MrCode Jun 7 '13 at 16:39
1  
Just checked to verify: HTML within <pre> elements is parsed. So any HTML could cause issues if it's not escaped. –  cHao Jun 7 '13 at 16:42

Simply do this (when working with HTML, which I assume):

echo "<pre>", print_r($a), "</pre>"

That' s it. If you might wonder why I used , instead of .:

echo takes multiple parameters, using commas is faster then string concatenation.

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