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I have overlapping adjacent pairings (1:2) (2:3) (3:4) (4:5) (7:8) .. ..

I want to identify all the permutations, but each side of the pair can only be used once within a permutation, and I want to know the unused values.

ie.
(1:2) (3:4) (7:8) unused: 5
(2:3) (4:5) (7:8) unused: 1
(1:2) (4:5) (7:8) unused: 3

Thanks in advance for suggestions and thoughts.

Some actual pair lists I'm working with are

list1 = [(427, 3434), (614, 2445), (840, 614), (910, 3939), (1065, 4314), (1347, 2616), (2445, 427), (2616, 3901), (2749, 1065), (3403, 910), (3434, 1347), (3659, 1411), (3901, 3684), (3939, 2638), (4203, 3403), (4314, 840)]

list2 = [(1218, 134), (3344, 1218), (3683, 3344), (2055, 3683), (2709, 2055)]

share|improve this question
    
This is not really clear. Could you edit the question in order to explain things a little more? – Sylvain Leroux Jun 7 '13 at 19:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's a quick program I threw together to solve this. It's probably not the most efficient way to go about this, but it gets the job done.

l = [(1,2),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5)]  # replace with whatever your full list is
import itertools
for perm in itertools.permutations(l,len(l) / 2):
    pair_list = []
    for pair in perm:
        if pair[0] in itertools.chain(*(i for i in pair_list)) \
        or pair[1] in itertools.chain(*(i for i in pair_list)):
            break
        pair_list.append(pair)
    if len(pair_list) == len(l) / 2:
        unused = []
        for n in itertools.chain(*(i for i in l)):
            if n not in itertools.chain(*(i for i in pair_list)) and n not in unused:
                unused.append(n)
        print pair_list,'unused:',unused

Also, are you sure you want to identify all the permutations? To get your exact output, I would need to replace itertools.permutations with itertools.combinations.

Here is the output I get using itertools.permutations:

[(1, 2), (3, 4)] unused: [5]
[(1, 2), (4, 5)] unused: [3]
[(2, 3), (4, 5)] unused: [1]
[(3, 4), (1, 2)] unused: [5]
[(4, 5), (1, 2)] unused: [3]
[(4, 5), (2, 3)] unused: [1]

Whereas what I get using itertools.combinations:

[(1, 2), (3, 4)] unused: [5]
[(1, 2), (4, 5)] unused: [3]
[(2, 3), (4, 5)] unused: [1]

Edit: Ok, it got a bit tougher with this new revision. What I do now is find all the subgroups within the larger list where the pairs are all adjacent to one another. I find the combinations for each of the subgroups, then put them all back together with an itertools.product at the end. Also, in my test case, I added an extra pair (8,9) to the end to make sure that everything worked for multiple groups. Here's the code:

l = [(1,2),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5),(7,8),(8,9)]
import itertools,math

## Create sublists for each set of adjacent pairs
l.sort(lambda x,y:cmp(x[0],y[0]))
newl = []
subl = []
for i in range(len(l)):
    if subl == []:
        subl.append(l[i])
    else:
        if l[i][0] == subl[-1][1]:
            subl.append(l[i])
        else:
            newl.append(subl)
            subl = [l[i]]
newl.append(subl)
pair_lists = []

## Find all combinations for each sublist
for subl in newl:
    cur_pair_list = []
    for perm in itertools.combinations(subl,int(math.ceil(len(subl) / 2.0))):
        pair_list = []
        for pair in perm:
            if pair[0] in itertools.chain(*pair_list) \
            or pair[1] in itertools.chain(*pair_list):
                break
            pair_list.append(pair)
        if len(pair_list) == int(math.ceil(len(subl) / 2.0)):
            cur_pair_list.append(pair_list)
    pair_lists.append(cur_pair_list)

## Combine combinations for each sublist and determine unused for each combination
final_list = list(list(itertools.chain(*i)) for i in itertools.product(*pair_lists))
for subl in final_list:
    unused = []
    for n in itertools.chain(*l):
        if n not in itertools.chain(*subl) and n not in unused:
            unused.append(n)
    print subl,'unused:',unused

And here's the output:

[(1, 2), (3, 4), (7, 8)] unused: [5, 9]
[(1, 2), (3, 4), (8, 9)] unused: [5, 7]
[(1, 2), (4, 5), (7, 8)] unused: [3, 9]
[(1, 2), (4, 5), (8, 9)] unused: [3, 7]
[(2, 3), (4, 5), (7, 8)] unused: [1, 9]
[(2, 3), (4, 5), (8, 9)] unused: [1, 7]

Edit #2: So here, then only new thing I had to do was change the way that the list was sorted. All the code below the comment ## Find all combinations for each sublist can stay the same.

Here's the new code that goes above that comment:

l = [(427, 3434), (614, 2445), (840, 614), (910, 3939), (1065, 4314), (1347, 2616), (2445, 427), (2616, 3901), (2749, 1065), (3403, 910), (3434, 1347), (3659, 1411), (3901, 3684), (3939, 2638), (4203, 3403), (4314, 840)]
import itertools,math


def sort(l):
    l = list(l)
    newl = []
    subl = []
    i = l[0]
    while len(l) > 0:
        subl.append(i)
        l.remove(i)
        k = None
        for j in l:
            if j[0] == i[1]:
                    k = j
                    break
        if k:
            i = k
        else:
            newl.append(subl)
            subl = []
            if len(l) > 0:
                i = l[0]
    i = 0
    while i < len(newl):
        j = 0
        while j < len(newl):
            if newl[j][-1][1] == newl[i][0][0]:
                for k in newl[j][::-1]:
                    newl[i].insert(0,k)
                newl.pop(j)
                continue
            j += 1
        i += 1

    return newl

pair_lists = []
newl = sort(l)

Here's the output I get when I run this on your new list:

[(2749, 1065), (4314, 840), (614, 2445), (427, 3434), (1347, 2616), (3901, 3684), (4203, 3403), (910, 3939), (3659, 1411)] unused: [2638]
[(2749, 1065), (4314, 840), (614, 2445), (427, 3434), (1347, 2616), (3901, 3684), (4203, 3403), (3939, 2638), (3659, 1411)] unused: [910]
[(2749, 1065), (4314, 840), (614, 2445), (427, 3434), (1347, 2616), (3901, 3684), (3403, 910), (3939, 2638), (3659, 1411)] unused: [4203]
share|improve this answer
    
I think this does the trick, the first run on my data has indicated that some of my left right pairings are off. – Steven Jun 7 '13 at 21:02
    
This doesn't quite work, not all pairs necessarily overlap, and they are reported as an unused pair. eg change the last pair to (6,7) – Steven Jun 11 '13 at 23:23
    
Can you edit the expected output for if you had the pairs (1:2) (2:3) (3:4) (6:7) so I have a better idea of what it is that you want? – Brien Jun 12 '13 at 13:36
    
have updated the input and expected output. Thanks. – Steven Jun 12 '13 at 17:00
    
Added more code. – Brien Jun 12 '13 at 18:23

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