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I have a basic dialog window which allows users to enter some information. When they click the AddButton, the application validates the user information and displays a message if the operation fails. There is a static label next to the button which is initially hidden. When the button is clicked, the label becomes visible before the validation operation begins, and becomes invisible again after the operation ends. Notice that this validation operation happens on a remote machine, so the UI freezes during this time (it's by design).

Here's the XAML code:

<Label Name="lblStatus" Content="Verifying connection..." Visibility="Hidden" Grid.Column="0" />

<StackPanel Grid.Column="1" Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Right">
   <Button Content="Add" Width="80" Margin="0,0,5,0" Click="AddButton_Click"/>
   <Button Content="Cancel" Width="80" IsCancel="True"/>
</StackPanel>

And the code-behind:

private void AddButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;

    // Validation occurs here. The UI is freezed for about 3 seconds
    Foo.Validate();

    lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Hidden;
}

The problem is that when the button is clicked, the label doesn't become visible before the UI freezes. When the operation failes, a dialog show pops up. At that point, you see the label, but that is when the UI wakes up. This makes me think that the UI doesn't have enough time to re-render the lable by the time foo.Validate() is called. I was wondering if my theory is correct or not, and what would be "right" way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
Don't worry about MVVM, at least not in this case, here your problem is that Validate() takes too long and is being processed on the UI thread (there is only one UI thread in WPF), just process Validate() on a diff thread that will release UI then notify UI of changes you want it to display –  denis morozov Jun 7 '13 at 19:49
    
@HighCore I do know and have used the MVVM pattern. The application already has enough views, viewmodels, and models that I decided to handle this simple dialog in the good, old code-behind way. –  PoweredByOrange Jun 7 '13 at 20:02
1  
@programmer93 nobody who used the MVVM pattern correctly would ever say that. "good-old" code behind? are you kiddin? I'd rather say crappy, impossible to scale, impossible to debug, impossible to test, code behind, impossible to customize, code behind. –  HighCore Jun 7 '13 at 20:04
2  
@HighCore Not quite. MVVM is not always the best solution. In the real computer science world, there's never a "best" solution. It all depends on your design. –  PoweredByOrange Jun 7 '13 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
private void AddButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
        Task.Factory.StartNew(()=>
            {
                Foo.Validate();
                OnUi(() => lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Hidden);
            }
        };
    }


public static void OnUi (Action action)
{
    if (_dispatchService == null) _dispatchService = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IDispatchService>();

     if (_dispatchService.CheckAccess())
            action.Invoke ();
        else
            _dispatchService.Invoke(action);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What is "OnUi"? You mean to use Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke there, right? –  McGarnagle Jun 7 '13 at 19:49
1  
Yes, you are correct, OnUi is the name of the method that I put as an additional sample on how to use Dispatcher.Invoke(), the method takes any action and puts it on the Ui thread... –  denis morozov Jun 7 '13 at 19:52

I have had this problem before, here is how I solved it:

public class CsUtil
{
    public static void DoEvents()
    {
        Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(
            DispatcherPriority.Background,
            new ThreadStart(DoNothing));
    }
    private static void DoNothing() 
    {
        // Just as it says, this method does nothing :-P
    }
}

This class will pretty much give you the old DoEvents() method from WinForms. This basically creates a new thread, calls a method that does nothing and the then kills the thread. Somehow, this gives focus back the UI thread and updates happen a bit quicker.

To use this, just do this (in code-behind):

private void AddButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;

    // Validation occurs here. The UI is freezed for about 3 seconds
    CsUtil.DoEvents();
    Foo.Validate();

    lblStatus.Visibility = Visibility.Hidden;
}

Good luck, let me know if it doesn't work,

Regards,

Kyle

share|improve this answer
1  
-1. Your solution is equivalent to winforms' Application.DoEvents(), which is a really BAD way to resolve threading / message queue issues. –  HighCore Jun 7 '13 at 19:48

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