Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote the following code:

int main(){

int i=-1,j=-1,k=0,l=2,m;
m = i++ && j++ && k++ || l++;
printf("%d %d %d %d %d",i,j,k,l,m);

i=-1,j=-1,k=0,l=2,m;
m = ++i && ++j && ++k || ++l;
printf("\n%d %d %d %d %d",i,j,k,l,m);
    return(0);
}

and i got the following result:

    0 0 1 3 1

    0 -1 0 3 1

as i know postfix and prefix operators are solved after the semicolon,ie. the original values are used in the expression and then the variables resolve themselves. In that case

     i++ && j++ 

should be equal to

      ++i && ++j 

and both should be equivalent to

     i && j;
     i = i+1;
     j = j+1;

and hence the result for the two expressions must be same. but it is not so. please anyone can help me with where do i have a wrong concept.

share|improve this question
    
If you have int i = 0;, then the value of ++i is 1 and the value of i++ is 0. –  Kerrek SB Jun 7 '13 at 19:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

i++ && j++ is definitely not equivalent to ++i && ++j.

Take the case where both are zero - the first results in:

0 && j++

yielding a 0 result (and because of short-circuiting, j won't even get incremented).

In the second case, you'll get

1 && 1

yielding a 1 result.

With that in mind, let's look at your examples (spaces, semicolons and newlines added for readability):

  1. First up:

    int i = -1;
    int j = -1;
    int k =  0;
    int l =  2;
    int m = i++ && j++ && k++ || l++;
    

    Let's first parenthesize completely to make it easier to deal with:

    int m = ((i++ && j++) && k++) || l++;
    

    So, what's going to happen? First, the i++. i is incremented (and becomes 0), but because it's a post-increment, the expression's result is -1. That gives:

    int m = ((-1 && j++) && k++) || l++;
    

    Since the left side of that && is non-zero, the right side is evaluated. j++ increments j to 0, but again, post-increment means the expression's value is -1.

    int m = ((-1 && -1) && k++) || l++;
    

    Resolve that &&:

    int m = (1 && k++) || l++;
    

    Next, the right side of the remaining &&. k is incremented, becoming 1, but the expression yields 0:

    int m = (1 && 0) || l++;
    

    Resolve this &&:

    int m = 0 || l++;
    

    And finally, because the left side of the || is 0, the right side is evaluted. l is incremented, becoming 3, but as a post-increment, yields 2:

    int m = 0 || 3;
    

    Finally:

    int m = 1;
    

    And along the way we ended up with:

    i = 0;
    j = 0;
    k = 1;
    l = 3;
    

    Explaining your first printout.

  2. Next, let's look at the second example (more condensed; let me know if you want more details):

    int i = -1, j = -1, k = 0, l = 2, m;
    m = ((++i && ++j) && ++k) || ++l;   // parenthesized for readability
           ^                            // i is pre-incremented
    m = (( 0  && ++j) && ++k) || ++l;
               ^                        // first && operator short-circuits
    m = (0 && ++k) || ++l;
            ^                           // second && operator short-circuits
    m = 0 || ++l;
              ^                         // l is pre-incremented
    m = 0 || 3;
           ^                            // evaluate || operator
    m = 1;
    

    The results are:

    i =  0
    j = -1
    k =  0
    l =  3
    m =  1
    

    Exactly what you saw printed out.

share|improve this answer
    
for i++ && j++ the expression is evaluated with the old values of i and j and once the expression is evaluated then i and j are updated. same is the case with ++i && ++j. I figured the above concept from the note 2 at the bottom of this page: difranco.net/compsci/C_Operator_Precedence_Table.htm if they are different please tell in what order are they solved. –  benny Mr. Jun 7 '13 at 20:00
    
That table is misleading at best. Check the C FAQ for a better source. –  Carl Norum Jun 7 '13 at 20:09
    
thankyou so much sir,it has really strengthen my concept. –  benny Mr. Jun 7 '13 at 20:19

The problem is your conditional operator:

m=i++&&j++&&k++||l++;

The program will start checking the conditional statement (i++ && j++), which equates to (-1 && -1) which comes out true, therefore it continues the statement (true && k++) which means (true && 0) which is false. It will then check the OR conditional (false || l++) which means (false || 2). Each time it processed the conditional, the values were incremented via the ++ operator.

The second statement, however...

m=++i&&++j&&++k||++l;

The program started the conditional (++i && ++j) which equates to (0 && ++j). It therefore immediately saw the first condition ++i as false and immediately regarded the rest of the block(m=++i&&++j&&++k) as false, not ever processing the ++j or ++k as it did not need to, to determine that the block was going to fail. It then proceeds to the OR condition (false || ++l) or (false || 3) which is true, m=1.

In the end, the second statement only ever process ++i and ++l, leaving the others un-touched.

I would do a little research on something called "short circuiting", as it is the term that describes why this happens.

share|improve this answer
    
thankyou sir,actually i was mislead with a statement : Postfix increment/decrement have high precedence, but the actual increment or decrement of the operand is delayed (to be accomplished sometime before the statement completes execution). I got this on the net.I still could not understand what does it mean but I got my ans. thankyou! –  benny Mr. Jun 7 '13 at 20:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.