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I have two tables that I need to join, the first table contains CustomerNumber and IdentificationNumber, and IdentificationType. The second table contains the IdentificationType, EffectiveDate, and EndDate.

My Query basically looks like this:

Select CustomerNumber, IdentificationNumber
From Identification i
Inner Join IdentificationType it On it.IdentificationType = i.IdentificationType
And it.EffectiveDate < @TodaysDate
And (it.EndDate IS NULL Or it.EndDate > @TodaysDate)

My execution plan is showing a clustered index scan on the identification type table, I'm assuming it's because of the OR in the join clause.

Is there a more efficient way to join, KNOWING that the EndDate field MUST allow Null, or a real datetime value?

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1  
What version of SQL Server? –  ErikE Jun 7 '13 at 20:57
    
Could you show execution plan, please? –  Alexander Fedorenko Jun 8 '13 at 9:17
    
Sorry, SQL Server 2008R2 –  ganders Jun 10 '13 at 12:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know you said the EndDate column MUST allow NULL, so just for the record: the most efficient way is to stop using NULLs in place of "no end date" in the IdentificationType table, and instead use 9999-12-31. Then your queries can skip the whole OR clause. (I understand this might require some application changes, but it would be worth it in my opinion for this exact reason--and I have seen this "NULL = open ended" pattern make queries difficult or perform badly over and over again in my own work and in SQL questions online.)

Also, you might consider swapping the order of the two OR conditions--this may sound like voodoo but I believe I heard that there are some special cases where it can optimize better when the variable is first in this specific scenario (though I could be wrong).

In the meantime, would you try this and share how well it performs compared to your and other solutions?

SELECT
   CustomerNumber, IdentificationNumber
FROM
   dbo.Identification i
   INNER JOIN dbo.IdentificationType it
      ON it.IdentificationType = i.IdentificationType
WHERE
   it.EffectiveDate < @TodaysDate
   AND it.EndDate IS NULL
UNION ALL
SELECT
   CustomerNumber, IdentificationNumber
FROM
   dbo.Identification i
   INNER JOIN dbo.IdentificationType it
      ON it.IdentificationType = i.IdentificationType
WHERE
   it.EffectiveDate < @TodaysDate
   AND it.EndDate > @TodaysDate
;

I have recovered from poor performance with OR clauses by using this exact strategy. It is painful to explode the query size/complexity, but the possibility of getting just a few seeks is totally worth it compared to the scan you're dealing with now.

There is something fishy about your inequality comparisons: The first one should have an equal sign in it <=. You didn't tell us the data type of the date columns and @TodaysDate, but best practice is to design a system so it does not fail for any input. So even if the variable is datetime and EffectiveDate has no time portion, it should still be <= on that comparison so a query at exactly midnight doesn't fail to include the data for that day.

P.S. Sorry about not preserving your formatting--I just understand queries better when formatted in my preferred style. Also, I moved the date conditions to the WHERE clause because in my opinion they are not part of the JOIN.

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I can look into trying to implement this approach, but would have to do a massive search on our code base to search for all "EndDate" columns, and implement a default value (of DateTime.MaxValue) if nothing is passed. I'll start searching to see how difficult that will be. –  ganders Jun 10 '13 at 17:29
    
Thanks again Erik. FYI - all of our date columns are of DateTime format, as well as the @TodaysDate variable. I'm working on tweaking this one stored procedure, as well as looking at implmeenting this system-wide. –  ganders Jun 10 '13 at 18:42
1  
I strongly encourage you to do some testing on performance of all the different methods available to you (my answers and others). That should make certain aspects come to light that are not clear to you now. –  ErikE Jun 10 '13 at 21:25

Try using isnull instead of the OR statement. I also think you should use Datediff instead of the comparison operator.

select CustomerNumber, IdentificationNumber
From Identification i
Inner Join IdentificationType it On it.IdentificationType = i.IdentificationType
And it.EffectiveDate < @TodaysDate
And (isnull(it.EndDate,@TodaysDate) >= @TodaysDate)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious to why people down-voted this answer. Does the query not perform very well using the ISNULL function? It SOUNDED like a good answer to me, without any testing... –  ganders Jun 10 '13 at 14:28
    
For one thing, notice the change of > to >= which alters the EndDate to be inclusive instead of exclusive: this does not express the same logical conditions as given in the question. If you do performance testing perhaps you could share the results with us. –  ErikE Jun 10 '13 at 21:28

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