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Is there the regular expression that can completely remove a HTML tag? By the way, I'm using Java.

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2  
Typing your title into the Search box, I got the following: stackoverflow.com/search?q=How+to+remove+HTML+tag+in+Java ... did you not get the same while you were posting the question? –  kdgregory Nov 9 '09 at 12:37
    
I found no duplicates. These questions care about extracting text from HTML: stackoverflow.com/questions/240546/… stackoverflow.com/questions/832620/stripping-html-tags-in-java –  tangens Nov 10 '09 at 17:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You should use a HTML parser instead. I like htmlCleaner, because it gives me a pretty printed version of the HTML.

With htmlCleaner you can do:

TagNode root = htmlCleaner.clean( stream );
Object[] found = root.evaluateXPath( "//div[id='something']" );
if( found.length > 0 && found instanceof TagNode ) {
    ((TagNode)found[0]).removeFromTree();
}
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Thanks for pointing me to htmlCleaner :) –  exhuma Nov 9 '09 at 12:16
    
Do we need to get any library in-order to use this above code? And root.evaluateXPath( "//div[id='something']" ); in this "something " could be any id rite? please let me know. thanks –  Geet taunk Aug 26 '13 at 14:54

There is JSoup which is a java library made for HTML manipulation. Look at the clean() method and the WhiteList object. Easy to use solution!

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WOW, you sir, really made my day, i like that, YES! Markdownj, Markdown4J, htmlCleaner.. all of them is ***** sorry.. JSoup is the one and only where you really achieve that with a one-liner: String plain = new HtmlToPlainText().getPlainText(Jsoup.parse(html)); –  jebbie Jul 17 '13 at 14:56

No. Regular expressions can not by definition parse HTML.

You could use a regex to s/<[^>]*>// or something naive like that but it's going to be insufficient, especially if you're interested in removing the contents of tags.

As another poster said, use an actual HTML parser.

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If you just need to remove tags then you can use this regular expression:

content = content.replaceAll("<[^>]+>", "");

It will remove only tags, but not other HTML stuff. For more complex things you should use parser.

EDIT: To avoid problems with HTML comments you can do the following:

content = content.replaceAll("<!--.*?-->", "").replaceAll("<[^>]+>", "");
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Since you do not use any of the meat characters ., ^ and $, the s- and m flags can be omitted. –  Bart Kiers Nov 9 '09 at 9:50
    
This regex is liable to cause mangling if the HTML contains XML comments with embedded '<' or '>' characters. –  Stephen C Nov 9 '09 at 12:24

You don't need any HTML parser. The below code removes all HTML comments:

htmlString = htmlString.replaceAll("(?s)<!--.*?-->", "");

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Alternatively, if your intent is to display user-controlled input back to the client, then you can also just replace all < by &lt; and all > by &gt;. This way the HTML won't be interpreted as-is by the client's application (the webbrowser).

If you're using JSP as view technology, then you can use JSTL's c:out for this. It will escape all HTML entities by default. So for example

<c:out value="<script>alert('XSS');</script>" />

will NOT display the alert, but just show the actual string as is.

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you can use this simple code to remove all html tags...

htmlString.replaceAll("\\<.*?\\>", ""))
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1  
This will only remove opening tags and leave closing tags unhandled. –  jlordo Jan 4 '13 at 23:52
    
i never would do a job like that on my own - parsing html into plain-text is really a though job dude.. –  jebbie Jul 17 '13 at 14:57

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