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Generally, when I'm not using JQuery, I use the following utility function to get properties from a stylesheet using Javascript. This works nicely to get values from CSS style sheets:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>

<style>

.foo {
    color: red;
}

</style>

<script type = "text/javascript">
function getcss(selector, property) 
{
    var len = document.styleSheets.length;

    for (var idx = 0; idx < len; ++idx)
    {
        var sheet = document.styleSheets && document.styleSheets[idx]; 

        if (sheet)
        {
            var r = sheet.rules ? sheet.rules : sheet.cssRules; 
            if (r) 
            {
                var i = r.length; 
                while (i--)
                {
                    if (r[i].selectorText && r[i].selectorText.toLowerCase() === selector.toLowerCase()) 
                    {
                        return (r[i].style[property]);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}

function exec()
{
    alert(getcss(".foo", "color"));
}
</script>
</head>

<body onload = "exec()">
</body>
</html>


The problem is that it doesn't take into account media queries. If I replace the <style> section of the above code with:

.foo {
    color: red;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 600px) {
    .foo {
        color: green;
    }
}

...it still outputs red if I shrink the window to smaller than 600px.

Is this correct WC3 behavior? Or is this a browser bug? (I'm testing with Firefox 12 on Ubuntu).

Is there anyway to correct this, so that Javascript "sees" the correct style sheet as required by the media query?

share|improve this question
    
Look at respond.js and how it does it. Personally I don't know but it's a polyfill for media queries so it must do what you are talking about –  Leeish Jun 7 '13 at 21:26
    
you return the first match, when in CSS, normally the last match is more likely to be applied. To be sure, it's going to be complex to tell for sure, and you'll have to parse/test the media queries somehow. –  dandavis Jun 7 '13 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

Your code is simply looking through the rules of a stylesheet, and only the first list of rules at that. The rules are a object representation of the stylesheet -- they don't change just because you've resized your browser.

In your code you're never going to see the green rul because you're only iterating over the items in the first CSSRuleList. The trick here is you need to recursively loop over any additional rules that are CSSMediaRule and contain their own CSSRuleList. For you, the sheet.rules contains both a single CSSSyleRule (which is your .foo { color:red; }) and a CSSMediaRule (which is your media query). That second rule then its own CSSRuleList, which you can traverse to find your green color.

In this case, here's where your data lies:

// Assuming sheet 0 is your stylesheet above    
var sheet = document.styleSheets[0];

// First rule is ".foo { color: red; }"
console.log(sheet.cssRules[0].cssText);

// Second Rule is your "@media" and its first rule is ".foo { color: green; }"
console.log(sheet.cssRules[1].cssRules[0].cssText); 
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