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During my work on writing a unit test for a framework that shall work with all kind of standard C++11 container I stepped over the problem that I want to create in a generic way test data. Here I need to know if an associated container C is a multi* container. Eg. if C is a std::set or a std::multiset. I searched through the interface of all of these containers and all of them have in common that they have an insert(value_type const&) method. But from my point of view the significant difference is that the multi* version returns just an iterator, but the 'non' multi* version return a std::pair. So I choose this as differentiator.

My resulting code is:

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

template <typename Container>
class is_multi_container
{
  typedef typename Container::value_type T;
  typedef typename Container::iterator ExpectedType;
  typedef decltype(Container().insert(T())) ResultType;
public:
  static const bool value = std::is_same<ResultType, ExpectedType>::value;
};

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <map>
#include <unordered_set>
#include <unordered_map>

int main() {
  std::cout << "std::set<T> is " << is_multi_container<std::set<int>>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "std::multiset<T> is " << is_multi_container<std::multiset<int>>::value << std::endl;

  std::cout << "std::map<K,T> is " << is_multi_container<std::map<int,double>>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "std::multimap<K,T> is " << is_multi_container<std::multimap<int,double>>::value << std::endl;

  std::cout << "std::unordered_set<T> is " << is_multi_container<std::unordered_set<int>>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "std::unordered_multiset<T> is " << is_multi_container<std::unordered_multiset<int>>::value << std::endl;

  std::cout << "std::unordered_map<K,T> is " << is_multi_container<std::unordered_map<int,double>>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "std::unordered_multimap<K,T> is " << is_multi_container<std::unordered_multimap<int,double>>::value << std::endl;
}

According to this small test program, it seems to work, but I am not sure if a) this solutions has problems that I do not see so far and b) if there is a more elegant way to write such a trait? I am aware that the trait only works with associative container.

Many thanks in advance!

PS.: I have to work with Visual Studio 2010.

share|improve this question
1  
This looks pretty good! More elegant, you say? –  migle Jun 7 '13 at 22:06
2  
The typename before decltype is not necessary (I needed to remove it to compile on gcc). –  Jesse Good Jun 7 '13 at 22:07
1  
prajmus, typeid().name() is RTTI, which has a runtime cost, this is a compile-time test. –  migle Jun 7 '13 at 22:14
1  
You can't use typeid().name() without parsing it, because it could be a set<multiset<U>> (for instance) –  Nevin Jun 7 '13 at 22:17
1  
std::type_info::name() returns an implementation-defined string, there is no guarantee it contains "multi" –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 7 '13 at 23:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Seeing as there are a small finite number of std::multi* containers, you can just list them:

#include <set>
#include <map>
#include <unordered_set>
#include <unordered_map>

#include <type_traits>

template <typename Container>
struct is_multi_container :
    std::false_type
{};

template <typename T, typename Compare, typename Alloc>
struct is_multi_container<std::multiset<T, Compare, Alloc>> :
    std::true_type
{};

template <typename T, typename Compare, typename Alloc>
struct is_multi_container<std::multimap<T, Compare, Alloc>> :
    std::true_type
{};

template <typename T, typename Compare, typename Alloc>
struct is_multi_container<std::unordered_multiset<T, Compare, Alloc>> :
    std::true_type
{};

template <typename T, typename Compare, typename Alloc>
struct is_multi_container<std::unordered_multimap<T, Compare, Alloc>> :
    std::true_type
{};

More lines of code, but it's easy to read and is direct in its reasoning (i.e., it definitely works!).

Being an explicit list, the caveat is that it doesn't extend itself automatically. For that, your solution is good. C++14 may have an AssociativeContainer concept which would make this even easier; research on this is left as an exercise for the reader. ;)

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::boolalpha;

    #define TEST(type, ...)                                     \
            std::cout << type " is: "                           \
                      << is_multi_container<__VA_ARGS__>::value \
                      << std::endl

    TEST("std::set<T>", std::set<int>);
    TEST("std::multiset<T>", std::multiset<int>);

    TEST("std::map<K,T>", std::map<int, double>);
    TEST("std::multimap<K,T>", std::multimap<int, double>);

    TEST("std::unordered_set<T>", std::unordered_set<int>);
    TEST("std::unordered_multiset<T>", std::unordered_multiset<int>);

    TEST("std::unordered_map<K,T>", std::unordered_map<int, double>);
    TEST("std::unordered_multimap<K,T>", std::unordered_multimap<int, double>);
}

Output:

std::set<T> is: false
std::multiset<T> is: true
std::map<K,T> is: false
std::multimap<K,T> is: true
std::unordered_set<T> is: false
std::unordered_multiset<T> is: true
std::unordered_map<K,T> is: false
std::unordered_multimap<K,T> is: true
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response! I had something similar comparing to your idea in mind. I see the advantage of your solution, because the traits "speak" more what they mean. But I was looking for a more elegant solution that is readable and shorter. –  Felix Petriconi Jun 7 '13 at 22:35
    
@FelixPetriconi: Shorter doesn't really imply readable, and tricky doesn't imply elegant. It's not like you're going to stare at it everyday once you've completed it. Stuff this into "is_multi_container.hpp" and never look at it again. –  GManNickG Jun 7 '13 at 22:40
    
Nice. Could you tackle the duplication with a typelist? –  Peter Wood Jun 7 '13 at 23:34
1  
In theory the Associative Container requirements apply to more types than just the standard containers, so the OP's solution is more generic and would work with third-party containers meeting the same concepts, e.g. from Boost.Container –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 7 '13 at 23:37
    
@PeterWood: Which duplication? :) –  GManNickG Jun 7 '13 at 23:37

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