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Consider the following simple rsync script I am tryint to slap up:

#!/bin/bash
PROJECT="$1"
USER=stef
LOCAL_DIR="~/drupal-files/"

REMOTE_HOST="hostname.com"
REMOTE_PROJECTS_PATH=""

# Should not have anything to change below
PROJECT_LIST="proj1 proj2 proj3 quit"

echo "/nSelect project you wish to rsync\n\n"

select PROJECT in $PROJECT_LIST
do
  if [ "$PROJECT" = "quit" ]; then
   echo
   echo  "Quitting $0"
   echo
   exit
fi
echo "Rsynching $PROJECT from $REMOTE_HOST into" $LOCAL_DIR$PROJECT
rsync -avzrvP $USER@$REMOTE_HOST:/var/projects/$PROJECT/ $LOCAL_DIR$PROJECT
done
echo "Rsync complete."
exit;

The variable $LOCALDIR$PROJECT set in the rsync command always includes the scripts path, :

OUTPUT:

Rsynching casa from hostname.com.com into ~/drupal-files/casa
opening connection using: ssh -l stef hostname.com rsync --server --sender -vvlogDtprz                   e.iLsf . /var/groupe_tva/casa/
receiving incremental file list
rsync: mkdir "/home/stef/bin/~/drupal-files/proj1" failed: No such file or directory (2)
rsync error: error in file IO (code 11) at main.c(605) [Receiver=3.0.9]

The line with mkdir should not have /home/stef/bin, why is bash adding the script's running dir on the variable?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
LOCAL_DIR="~/drupal-files/"

The string is in quotes so there's pathname expansion, and the variable will contain the literal string.

Remove the quotes.

$ x="~/test"; echo $x
~/test
$ x=~/test; echo $x
/home/user/test
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