Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to run a test if the number ends in .0

I am running a program with numbers orders of magnitude apart so I can't estimate to a certain amount of digits. using % doesn't work either because then certain numbers are excluded. All the numbers in this program are floating point numbers so I need a way to check if it ends with .0, not with .00000000000001232 or something it has to end exactly in .0

The problem with the round function is that I am dealing with numbers of several orders of magnitude. I need something that checks if it has only 1 decimal after the . or something that checks if the that decimal is a 0.

code:

from myro import *
from math import *


def main():

    z = 3
    a = 2
    b = 2
    x = 3
    y = 2 #starts at y = 3

    lim = 25

    c = (a**x + b**y)**(1.0/z)

    resultnum = 0    

    while z <= lim:

        while a <= lim:

            while b <= lim:

                while x <= lim:

                    while y <= lim:

                        y = y + 1
                        c = (a**x + b**y)**(1.0/z)

                        if float(int(c) + 1) != round(c, 6):
                            pass
                        else:
                            print str(a) + "^" + str(x) + " + " + str(b) + "^" + str(y) + " = " + str(int(c)+1) + "^" + str(z)
                            resultnum = resultnum + 1
                            print c

                    y = 3
                    x = x + 1

                x = 3
                b = b + 1

            b = 3
            a = a + 1

        a = 3
        z = z + 1
        print z

    print "code cycle complete"
    print str(resultnum) + " results"


main()
share|improve this question
2  
There's usually no "exactly zero" when you're using floating point numbers, just like 2.2 - 1.2 isn't exactly 1. –  Blender Jun 8 '13 at 1:56
    
That's the problem with floating points. I need it to be precise. –  Felis Vulpes Jun 8 '13 at 2:36

3 Answers 3

>>> n1 = 2.0
>>> int(n1) == n1 and isinstance(n1, float)
True
>>> n1 = 2
>>> int(n1) == n1 and isinstance(n1, float)
False
>>> n1 = 2.01
>>> int(n1) == n1 and isinstance(n1, float)
False
>>> n1 = 1E1         #works for scientific notation as well
>>> int(n1) == n1 and isinstance(n1, float)
True
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this works for 3e28 while the answer by @MikeMüller doesn't –  jamylak Jun 8 '13 at 4:40
    
+1 This is better than mine even though I fixed it. –  Mike Müller Jun 8 '13 at 8:27

Python does this already. Going with what Python gives as a string might be what you want:

In [577]: def dot_zero(number):
   .....:     return str(number).endswith('.0')
   .....: 

In [578]: dot_zero(2.0)
Out[578]: True

In [579]: dot_zero(2)
Out[579]: False

In [580]: dot_zero(2.01)
Out[580]: False

EDIT

As pointed out by @jamylak this does not work for large numbers since the scientific notation used by str. Keeping the basic idea of conversion into a string, but also catering for large numbers, we end up with more verbose and admittedly rather ugly solution:

def dot_zero_string(number):
    # tested and works with Python 3.3
    split = str(number).split('e')
    return len(split) == 2 or split[0].endswith('.0')

This is the solution in the answer from @AshwiniChaudhary

def dot_zero_inst(number):
    return int(number) == number and isinstance(number, float)

Comparing different cases gives the same result:

numbers = [1, 1.0, 1000, 1000.0, 3e38, 1.5555555555555555555555e12, 
           1.5555555555555555555555e17, 0, 0.0]
numbers = numbers + [-number for number in numbers]
for number in numbers:
    assert dot_zero_inst(number) == dot_zero_string(number)
share|improve this answer
1  
Try it on number = 3e28 (which doesn't work since it prints as 3e+28 –  jamylak Jun 8 '13 at 4:40
    
Added version that works with large numbers. –  Mike Müller Jun 8 '13 at 8:25
    
I get an AssertionError as expected with 1.5555555555555555555555e12 –  jamylak Jun 8 '13 at 8:33
    
I use Python 3.3. I also get an AssertioError in Python 2. –  Mike Müller Jun 8 '13 at 8:40

Just to show another method, you can always split by the '.':

>>> num = 12.023
>>> str(num).split('.')[1] == '0'
False
>>> num = 12.0
>>> str(num).split('.')[1] == '0'
True

Note that this works because you said that all were floating points. This will provide an error num is an int

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.