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How do I show a directory listing in 8.3 notation in PowerShell?

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My requirement for 8.3 names came about because I wanted to use DEBUG.exe to investigate a file at the byte level. (Of course I could do it in a CMD shell instead.) Unfortunately, I then discovered that 64-bit Windows does not have DEBUG.exe anymore. So I now need to start a new question on what's the best substitute for DEBUG.exe. – Old Geezer Jun 9 '13 at 12:44
2  
This is why it is good to tell why you want to do it, not just what. One possibility: Windows IT Pro: Get Hex Dumps of Files in PowerShell. – Bill_Stewart Jun 9 '13 at 16:22
    
@Bill_Stewart: Excellent! GC -Encoding Byte is useful. – Old Geezer Jun 10 '13 at 16:08
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use WMI:

Get-ChildItem | ForEach-Object{
    $class  = if($_.PSIsContainer) {"Win32_Directory"} else {"CIM_DataFile"}
    Get-WMIObject $class -Filter "Name = '$($_.FullName -replace '\\','\\')'" | Select-Object -ExpandProperty EightDotThreeFileName
}

Or the Scripting.FileSystemObject com object:

$fso = New-Object -ComObject Scripting.FileSystemObject

Get-ChildItem | ForEach-Object{

    if($_.PSIsContainer) 
    {
        $fso.GetFolder($_.FullName).ShortPath
    }
    else 
    {
        $fso.GetFile($_.FullName).ShortPath
    }    
}
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If you install the PSCX module you have the Get-ShortPath cmdlet and you can do:

dir | Get-ShortPath

or

 dir | Get-ShortPath  | select -expa shortpath
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As admin: choco install pscx -y – Cameron Taggart Feb 10 at 20:48
    
I used it like so (Get-ShortPath "C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\Lib\10.0.10586.0\um\x86").ShortPath to get C:\PROGRA~2\WI3CF2~1\10\Lib\100105~1.0\um\x86. – Cameron Taggart Feb 10 at 20:51

You attract my attention, this is not the full answer but my way to help you :

First : have a look to how to Control 8dot3 naming in Windows 2008 and Windows 7.

Second : here is a solution to Convert path to Dos 8.3 notation using C# that you can modify or use as is in PowerShell.

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Interesting. My requirement for 8.3 names came about because I wanted to use DEBUG.exe to investigate a file at the byte level. (Of course I oulcd do it in a CMD shell instead.) Unfortunately, I then discovered that 64-bit Windows does not have DEBUG.exe anymore. So I now need to start a new question on what's the best substitute for DEBUG.exe. – Old Geezer Jun 9 '13 at 12:42
    
What is your target using DEBUG.EXE? Have a look to WinDbg from (Debuging Tools for Window)msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/…) – JPBlanc Jun 9 '13 at 16:21
    
The ancient DEBUG.com, since DOS 1.1, is a small footprint always-there (until now) utility that could, besides disassembling Intel op code, read raw bytes in a file and load disk sectors. No, I wasn't wanting to use it to debug any code. Thanks anyway. – Old Geezer Jun 10 '13 at 15:59

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