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Javascript best practices & conventions, such as those emphasized by John Resig and by Nicholas Zachas, author of book Maintainable JavaScript, suggest using HTML comments or script tags with a custom type to store HTML templates.

Comment example:

<div id="myTemplate">
<!-- <ul><li>$item</li></ul> -->
</div>
<script>
   var myTemplate = document.getElementById('myTemplate').childNodes[0].data;
   var myHtml = myTemplate.replace(/\$item/g, itemValue);
</script>

Script tag example:

<script id="myTemplate" type="text/x-html-template">
    <ul><li>$item</li></ul>
</script>
<script>
   var myTemplate = document.getElementById('myTemplate').innerHTML;
   var myHtml = myTemplate.replace(/\$item/g, itemValue);
</script>

I strongly dislike the comment-based templating because comments are supposed to be just that--comments, intended to be ignored by the functioning application--and as such I'm a little bewildered as to how it even gets to be suggested by JS gurus.

The script tag templating makes a lot more sense, and I'd normally call it a best if not wonderful practice because the purpose and initial non-function are well-delineated. My only issue is that in some modern editors the color highlighting, autocompletion, auto markup validation, etc., are all lost while working within the script tag.

An approach to templating I've taken in the past is to put it all in a container div, then classify the container div as class="template", then in CSS mark it as ".template { display: none; }".

<div id="myTemplate" class="template">
    <ul><li>$item</li></ul>
</div>
<script>
   var myTemplate = document.getElementById('myTemplate').innerHTML;
   var myHtml = myTemplate.replace(/\$item/g, itemValue);
</script>

This has worked fine for me, although the DOM parser and renderer obviously processes the data up front unnecessarily, but I'm not sure whether this is really all that big of an issue or not, as long as the templating constructs do not break HTML validity rules.

My question, then, is, what am I missing? Is the only reason why this third approach to storing template markup--that is, putting it in the DOM as display:none--is discouraged because the DOM parser and renderer will process it anyway? Or are there other reasons, perhaps technical, that I haven't come across yet? I'd like to know because, again, I want to take advantage of my editor's ability to help me fine tune a proper HTML template.

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1  
Your last solutions, using display: none isn't good, because Search Engines will index the content within it (webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/35939/…). –  user1823761 Jun 8 '13 at 2:58
    
Have you looking at using require.js? Basically you can inject random text with the text! plugin and avoid what you said, crap on the html page and keep everything in memory. –  amchang87 Jun 8 '13 at 3:20
    
NOX you need to make this an answer as it is an actual answer to my actual question ("why else or is that it?") –  stimpy77 Jun 8 '13 at 16:56
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that the best method is using the <script> tag. But for your editor, it must has a solution to add HTML support into the <script> tag with type="html/template-something" too.

For example I code in Sublime Text, and when I want to write a script template tag, my editor showed me something like this:

enter image description here

As you see, the h1 tag inside the script tag, is different from real h1 in my HTML. So I search on the internet, and find a solution: finding a file name called HTML.tmLanguage and make this changes:

// change this line
<string>(?:^\s+)?(&lt;)((?i:script))\b(?![^&gt;]*/&gt;)</string>

// to this line
<string>(?:^\s+)?(&lt;)((?i:script))\b(?!([^&gt;]*text/template[^&gt;]*|[^&gt;]*/>))</string>

And after that, I get this result in my editor:

enter image description here

I'm sure there must be a solution for your editor.


Visual Studio 2012

In Visual Studio 2012, if you use the script like this:

<script id="myTemplate" type="text/html">

it will parse the content within it as HTML.


display: none;

Your last solutions, using display: none isn't good, because Search Engines will index the content within it, see this:

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Well the editor I use is Visual Studio 2012 (and occasionally WebMatrix when I'm reviewing tooling for instructing others). VS is highly extensible but I'm afraid I'd pretty much have to hack at it with a compiled add-in. –  stimpy77 Jun 8 '13 at 16:59
1  
@stimpy77 I think that in VS 12, if you use the script like this: <script id="myTemplate" type="text/html"> it will parse the content within it as HTML. Try it :) –  user1823761 Jun 8 '13 at 17:01
    
Meh .. you're right! –  stimpy77 Jun 8 '13 at 17:09
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That unnecessary parsing is why the script tag method is used.

Stating some type other than JS makes the browser ignore that block entirely. Thus, you save processing time and memory. But you might think "Surely users have powerful machines". Not necessarily.

Page performance is a lot slower on mobile, than on the desktop. Mobile has limited memory and processing power. So parsing that hidden block of HTML is unnecessary.

Also, you'll never know what's in the template. It could contain tables with 10k rows. Scripts run in those hidden blocks. It could contain heavy scripts that may contain blocking elements like synchronous XHRs or loops that run 100k times. Who knows!

Additionally, you'd be creating DOM elements and getting them as strings. Why not make them strings in the first place? Skip the DOM building part.

They are templates, you should be running them as needed, not unnecessarily. Unless you know what's inside those hidden tags of yours, then sure, why not? But releasing to the public or making it a generic guideline, I'd stick to the safer method.

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