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I am starting with java and while I was writing a way to identify whether a number was prime I wrote a method like this

public static boolean checkPrime(int n){
    int x = 2;
    while (((n % x) != 0) && (n > x)){
        x = x + 1;
    }
    if(((n % x) == 0) && (n == x)){     
        return !(PrimeOrNot);
    }
    else if(((n % x) == 0) && (n > x)){
        return (PrimeOrNot);
    }
    else{return PrimeOrNot;}
}

What I couldn't figure out was the necessity of the last else statement. If I do not put it, I get an error message. However I don't think it is necessary since all possibilities are covered by the previous loops, with their respecting return statements. Or am I missing something?

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4  
What you're missing is that while you know the rules of number theory, the compiler does not. As far as it knows, there is some case which is not covered, and therefore there must be a return to "cover" that case. –  dlev Jun 8 '13 at 2:30
    
Skip the last else statement and simply return PrimeOrNot at the end of the method. I'm old school and prefer one entry and one exit from all methods. Instead of retuning in the middle of the method, I would simple create a local variable called something like isPrime, set to false and simply change it when it need to be true and have one return statement at the end of the method... –  MadProgrammer Jun 8 '13 at 2:30
    
What is the error message? –  xagyg Jun 8 '13 at 2:30
    
No need for else when you return -- you can remove two of them here –  fge Jun 8 '13 at 2:31
    
@xagyg The error message is : error: missing return statement. –  FSB Jun 8 '13 at 2:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need the else. What you are being told by the compiler is the method must return SOMETHING. Your last else block could replaced by this:

return PrimeOrNot;

In fact, your method could look like this:

public static boolean checkPrime(int n){
    int x = 2;
    while (((n % x) != 0) && (n > x)){
        x = x + 1;
    }
    if(((n % x) == 0) && (n == x)){     
        return !(PrimeOrNot);
    }
    return (PrimeOrNot);
}

In any case your very last statement block cannot be an else if.

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The method has a return type of boolean.

The compiler is scared by the possibility in which none of the 'if' cases are met. In this situation, the method know what to return. This method needs to return something, so just give it a 'return true' before the method ends. It won't ever be read, but it will make the compiler happy.

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The conditional expressions within the if/else-if are only evaluated at runtime. Normally, the compiler wouldn't know what the result would be, because they are not evaluated at compile-time. Only, situation when the compiler can figure what the result of the expression would be is when it's some compile-time constant (like if(true) {).

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public static boolean checkPrime(int n){
    boolean PrimeOrNot = false;
    int x = 2;

    while (((n % x) != 0) && (n > x)){
        x = x + 1;
    }

    if(((n % x) == 0) && (n == x)){     
        return !(PrimeOrNot);
    }
    else if(((n % x) == 0) && (n > x)){
        return (PrimeOrNot);
    }

    return PrimeOrNot;
}
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A method which returns a value will be compilable if it returns a value in all its possible code paths.

Imagine for a moment that you're the compiler. You see this code:

int myMethod()
{
    if (cond)
        return anInt;
}

While you may know that cond is in fact always true, the compiler will not know that. It can only be sure about the result of a boolean expression if it is an expression which can be evaluated at compile time only.

Note that the vast majority of "code optimization" in Java is in fact done at run time (JIT: Just In Time).

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The compiler only checks to see if there are valid return paths from your method. The compiler isn't "smart" enough to inspect the conditional statements and determine whether the conditions can be logically met -- the compiler simply checks to make sure that some value is returned to respect the contract of the method declaration.

Some would argue that the following is a cleaner structure for the method (but I think it is just a matter of taste):

public static boolean checkPrime(int n){
    int x = 2;
    while (((n % x) != 0) && (n > x)){
        x = x + 1;
    }

    if(((n % x) == 0) && (n == x)){     
        return !(PrimeOrNot);
    }

    return (PrimeOrNot);
}
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