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When is it better to use a List(Of T) vs a LinkedList(Of T)?

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1  
Java q, shouldnt be very different. –  nawfal Jul 3 '14 at 0:39

11 Answers 11

up vote 81 down vote accepted

Edit

Please read the comments to this answer. People claim I did not do proper tests. I agree this should not be an accepted answer. As I was learning I did some tests and felt like sharing them.

Original answer...

I found interesting results:

// Temporary class to show the example
class Temp
{
    public decimal A, B, C, D;

    public Temp(decimal a, decimal b, decimal c, decimal d)
    {
        A = a;            B = b;            C = c;            D = d;
    }
}

Linked list (3.9 seconds)

        LinkedList<Temp> list = new LinkedList<Temp>();

        for (var i = 0; i < 12345678; i++)
        {
            var a = new Temp(i, i, i, i);
            list.AddLast(a);
        }

        decimal sum = 0;
        foreach (var item in list)
            sum += item.A;

List (2.4 seconds)

        List<Temp> list = new List<Temp>(); // 2.4 seconds

        for (var i = 0; i < 12345678; i++)
        {
            var a = new Temp(i, i, i, i);
            list.Add(a);
        }

        decimal sum = 0;
        foreach (var item in list)
            sum += item.A;

Even if you only access data essentially it is much slower!! I say never use a linkedList.




Here is another comparison performing a lot of inserts (we plan on inserting an item at the middle of the list)

Linked List (51 seconds)

        LinkedList<Temp> list = new LinkedList<Temp>();

        for (var i = 0; i < 123456; i++)
        {
            var a = new Temp(i, i, i, i);

            list.AddLast(a);
            var curNode = list.First;

            for (var k = 0; k < i/2; k++) // In order to insert a node at the middle of the list we need to find it
                curNode = curNode.Next;

            list.AddAfter(curNode, a); // Insert it after
        }

        decimal sum = 0;
        foreach (var item in list)
            sum += item.A;

List (7.26 seconds)

        List<Temp> list = new List<Temp>();

        for (var i = 0; i < 123456; i++)
        {
            var a = new Temp(i, i, i, i);

            list.Insert(i / 2, a);
        }

        decimal sum = 0;
        foreach (var item in list)
            sum += item.A;

Linked List having reference of location where to insert (.04 seconds)

        list.AddLast(new Temp(1,1,1,1));
        var referenceNode = list.First;

        for (var i = 0; i < 123456; i++)
        {
            var a = new Temp(i, i, i, i);

            list.AddLast(a);
            list.AddBefore(referenceNode, a);
        }

        decimal sum = 0;
        foreach (var item in list)
            sum += item.A;

So only if you plan on inserting several items and you also somewhere have the reference of where you plan to insert the item then use a linked list. Just because you have to insert a lot of items it does not make it faster because searching the location where you will like to insert it takes time.

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57  
There is one benefit to LinkedList over List (this is .net specific): since the List is backed by an internal array, it is allocated in one contiguous block. If that allocated block exceeds 85000 bytes in size, it will be allocated on the Large Object Heap, a non-compactable generation. Depending on the size, this can lead to heap fragmentation, a mild form of memory leak. –  JerKimball Sep 20 '12 at 6:32
15  
Note that if you're prepending a lot (as you're essentially doing in the last example) or deleting the first entry, a linked list will nearly always be significantly faster, as there is no searching or moving/copying to do. A List would require moving everything up a spot to accommodate the new item, making prepending an O(N) operation. –  cHao Sep 20 '12 at 19:32
3  
Note: This sounds completely typical of ANY linked list implementation, not just .Net's. –  Earlz Nov 11 '12 at 8:26
5  
Why the in-loop list.AddLast(a); in the last two LinkedList examples? I get doing it once before the loop, as with list.AddLast(new Temp(1,1,1,1)); in the next to last LinkedList, but it looks (to me) like you're adding twice as many Temp objects in the loops themselves. (And when I double-check myself with a test app, sure enough, twice as many in the LinkedList.) –  ruffin Apr 27 '13 at 16:54
9  
Sorry, but This answer is really bad. Please do NOT listen to this answer. Reason in a nutshell: It is completely flawed to think that array-backed list implementations are stupid enough to resize the array on each insertion. Linked lists are naturally slower than array-backed lists when traversing as well as when inserting at either end, because only they need to create new objects, while array-backed lists use a buffer (in both directions, obviously). The (poorly done) benchmarks indicate precisely that. The answer completely fails to check the cases in which linked lists are preferable! –  mafu Nov 18 '14 at 21:36

In most cases, List<T> is more useful. LinkedList<T> will have less cost when adding/removing items in the middle of the list, whereas List<T> can only cheaply add/remove at the end of the list.

LinkedList<T> is only at it's most efficient if you are accessing sequential data (either forwards or backwards) - random access is relatively expensive since it must walk the chain each time (hence why it doesn't have an indexer). However, because a List<T> is essentially just an array (with a wrapper) random access is fine.

List<T> also offers a lot of support methods - Find, ToArray, etc; however, these are also available for LinkedList<T> with .NET 3.5/C# 3.0 via extension methods - so that is less of a factor.

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One advantage of List<> vs. LinkedList<> that I'd never thought of concerns how microprocessors implement caching of memory. Although I don't understand it completely, the writer of this blog article talks a lot about "locality of reference", which makes traversing an array much faster than traversing a linked list, at least if the linked list has become somewhat fragmented in memory. kjellkod.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/… –  RenniePet Dec 18 '14 at 22:40
    
@RenniePet List is implemented with a dynamic array and arrays are contiguous blocks of memory. –  Casey Apr 2 at 2:05
    
Since List is a dynamic array, that's why sometimes it's good to specify the capacity of a List in the constructor if you know it beforehand. –  Cardin Jul 27 at 1:19

Thinking of a linked list as a list can be a bit misleading. It's more like a chain. In fact, in .NET, LinkedList<T> does not even implement IList<T>. There is no real concept of index in a linked list, even though it may seem there is. Certainly none of the methods provided on the class accept indexes.

Linked lists may be singly linked, or doubly linked. This refers to whether each element in the chain has a link only to the next one (singly linked) or to both the prior/next elements (doubly linked). LinkedList<T> is doubly linked.

Internally, List<T> is backed by an array. This provides a very compact representation in memory. Conversely, LinkedList<T> involves additional memory to store the bidirectional links between successive elements. So the memory footprint of a LinkedList<T> will generally be larger than for List<T> (with the caveat that List<T> can have unused internal array elements to improve performance during append operations.)

They have different performance characteristics too:

Append

  • LinkedList<T>.AddLast(item) constant time
  • List<T>.Add(item) amortized constant time, linear worst case

Prepend

  • LinkedList<T>.AddFirst(item) constant time
  • List<T>.Insert(0, item) linear time

Insertion

  • LinkedList<T>.AddBefore(node, item) constant time
  • LinkedList<T>.AddAfter(node, item) constant time
  • List<T>.Insert(index, item) linear time

Removal

  • LinkedList<T>.Remove(item) linear time
  • LinkedList<T>.Remove(node) constant time
  • List<T>.Remove(item) linear time
  • List<T>.RemoveAt(index) linear time

Count

  • LinkedList<T>.Count constant time
  • List<T>.Count constant time

Contains

  • LinkedList<T>.Contains(item) linear time
  • List<T>.Contains(item) linear time

Clear

  • LinkedList<T>.Clear() linear time
  • List<T>.Clear() linear time

As you can see, they're mostly equivalent. In practice, the API of LinkedList<T> is more cumbersome to use, and details of its internal needs spill out into your code.

However, if you need to do many insertions/removals from within a list, it offers constant time. List<T> offers linear time, as extra items in the list must be shuffled around after the insertion/removal.

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2  
Is count linkedlist constant? I thought that would be linear? –  Iain Ballard Nov 4 '11 at 10:05
5  
@Iain, the count is cached in both list classes. –  Drew Noakes Nov 4 '11 at 18:13
3  
You wrote that "List<T>.Add(item) logarithmic time", however it is in fact "Constant" if the list capacity can store the new item, and "Linear" if the list doesn't have enough space and new to be reallocated. –  aStranger Sep 16 '12 at 13:32
    
@aStranger, of course you're right. Not sure what I was thinking in the above -- perhaps that the amortized normal case time is logarithmic, which it isn't. In fact the amortized time is constant. I didn't get into best/worst case of the operations, aiming for a simple comparison. I think the add operation is significant enough to provide this detail however. Will edit the answer. Thanks. –  Drew Noakes Sep 16 '12 at 16:14
    
Good answer! You should mention that indexed access is constant time with List but linear with LinkedList. –  Robert Jeppesen Dec 3 '12 at 8:58

Linked lists provide very fast insertion or deletion of a list member. Each member in a linked list contains a pointer to the next member in the list so to insert a member at position i:

  • update the pointer in member i-1 to point to the new member
  • set the pointer in the new member to point to member i

The disadvantage to a linked list is that random access is not possible. Accessing a member requires traversing the list until the desired member is found.

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4  
I would add that linked lists have an overhead per item stored implied above via LinkedListNode which references the previous and next node. The payoff of that is a contiguous block of memory isn't required to store the list, unlike an array based list. –  paulecoyote Jul 22 '09 at 16:26
3  
Isn't a contiguous block of memory usually perferred? –  Jonathan Allen Feb 5 '10 at 19:52
6  
Yes, a contiguous block is preferred for random access performance and memory consumption but for collections that need to change size regularly a structure such as an Array generally need to be copied to a new location whereas a linked list only needs to manage the memory for the newly inserted/deleted nodes. –  jpierson Mar 17 '10 at 13:37
4  
If you have ever had to work with very large arrays or lists (a list just wraps an array) you will start to run into memory issues even though there appears to be plenty of memory available on your machine. The list uses a doubling strategy when it allocates new space in it's underlying array. So a 1000000 elemnt array that is full will be copied into a new array with 2000000 elements. This new array needs to be created in a contiguous memory space that is large enough to hold it. –  Andrew May 4 '11 at 8:57
1  
I had a specific case where all i did was adding and removing, and looping one by one... here the linked list was far superior to the normal list.. –  Peter Oct 27 '11 at 9:35

The difference between List and LinkedList lies in their underlying implementation. List is array based collection (ArrayList). LinkedList is node-pointer based collection (LinkedListNode). On the API level usage, both of them are pretty much the same since both implement same set of interfaces such as ICollection, IEnumerable, etc.

The key difference comes when performance matter. For example, if you are implementing the list that has heavy "INSERT" operation, LinkedList outperforms List. Since LinkedList can do it in O(1) time, but List may need to expand the size of underlying array. For more information/detail you might want to read up on the algorithmic difference between LinkedList and array data structures. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_list and Array

Hope this help,

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3  
List<T> is array (T[]) based, not ArrayList based. Re insert: the array resize isn't the issue (the doubling algorithm means that most of the time it doesn't have to do this): the issue is that it must block-copy all the existing data first, which takes a little time. –  Marc Gravell Oct 4 '08 at 8:38
2  
@Marc, the 'doubling algorithm" only makes it O(logN), but it is still worse than O(1) –  Ilya Ryzhenkov Oct 4 '08 at 10:02
1  
My point was that that it isn't the resize that causes the pain - it is the blit. So worst case, if we are adding the first (zeroth) element each time, then the blit has to move everything each time. –  Marc Gravell Oct 4 '08 at 10:23

The primary advantage of linked lists over arrays is that the links provide us with the capability to rearrange the items efficiently. Sedgewick, p. 91

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A common circumstance to use LinkedList is like this:

Suppose you want to remove many certain strings from a list of strings with a large size, say 100,000. The strings to remove can be looked up in HashSet dic, and the list of strings is believed to contain between 30,000 to 60,000 such strings to remove.

Then what's the best type of List for storing the 100,000 Strings? The answer is LinkedList. If the they are stored in an ArrayList, then iterating over it and removing matched Strings whould take up to billions of operations, while it takes just around 100,000 operations by using an iterator and the remove() method.

LinkedList<String> strings = readStrings();
HashSet<String> dic = readDic();
Iterator<String> iterator = strings.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()){
    String string = iterator.next();
    if (dic.contains(string))
    iterator.remove();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can simply use RemoveAll to remove the items from a List without moving a lot of items around, or use Where from LINQ to create a second list. Using a LinkedList here however ends up consuming dramatically more memory than other types of collections and the loss of memory locality means that it will be noticeably slower to iterate, making it quite a bit worse than a List. –  Servy Oct 21 '14 at 14:36
    
@Servy, note that @Tom's answer use Java. I'm not sure if there's a RemoveAll equivalent in Java. –  Arturo Torres Sánchez Nov 21 '14 at 2:05
    
@ArturoTorresSánchez Well the question specifically states that it's about .NET, so that just makes the answer that much less appropriate. –  Servy Nov 24 '14 at 15:08
    
@Servy, then you should have mentioned that from the beginning. –  Arturo Torres Sánchez Nov 24 '14 at 15:54

When you need built-in indexed access, sorting (and after this binary searching), and "ToArray()" method, you should use List.

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Use LinkedList<> when

  1. You don't know how many objects are coming through the flood gate. For example, Token Stream.
  2. When you ONLY wanted to delete\insert at the ends.

For everything else, it is better to use List<>.

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3  
I don't see why point 2 makes sense. Linked lists are great when you're doing many insertions/deletions throughout the entire list. –  Drew Noakes Dec 25 '12 at 20:23
    
Because of the fact that LinkedLists are not Index based, you really have to scan the entire list for insertion or deletion that incurs a O(n) penalty. List<> on the other hand suffers from Array resizing, but still,IMO, is a better option when compared to LinkedLists. –  Antony Thomas Dec 26 '12 at 22:45
    
You don't have to scan the list for insertions/deletions if you keep track of the LinkedListNode<T> objects in your code. If you can do that, then it's much better than using List<T>, especially for very long lists where inserts/removals are frequent. –  Drew Noakes Dec 26 '12 at 23:02
    
You mean thru a hashtable? If that is the case, that would be the typical space\time tradeoff that every computer programmer should make a choice based on the problem domain :) But yes, that would make it faster. –  Antony Thomas Dec 27 '12 at 4:23

This is adapted from Tono Nam's accepted answer correcting a few wrong measurements in it.

The test:

static void Main()
{
    LinkedListPerformance.AddFirst_List(); // 12028 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.AddFirst_LinkedList(); // 33 ms

    LinkedListPerformance.AddLast_List(); // 33 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.AddLast_LinkedList(); // 32 ms

    LinkedListPerformance.Enumerate_List(); // 1.08 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.Enumerate_LinkedList(); // 3.4 ms

    //I tried below as fun exercise - not very meaningful, see code
    //sort of equivalent to insertion when having the reference to middle node

    LinkedListPerformance.AddMiddle_List(); // 5724 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.AddMiddle_LinkedList1(); // 36 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.AddMiddle_LinkedList2(); // 32 ms
    LinkedListPerformance.AddMiddle_LinkedList3(); // 454 ms

    Environment.Exit(-1);
}

And the code:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

namespace stackoverflow
{
    static class LinkedListPerformance
    {
        class Temp
        {
            public decimal A, B, C, D;

            public Temp(decimal a, decimal b, decimal c, decimal d)
            {
                A = a; B = b; C = c; D = d;
            }
        }



        static readonly int start = 0;
        static readonly int end = 123456;
        static readonly IEnumerable<Temp> query = Enumerable.Range(start, end - start).Select(temp);

        static Temp temp(int i)
        {
            return new Temp(i, i, i, i);
        }

        static void StopAndPrint(this Stopwatch watch)
        {
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
        }

        public static void AddFirst_List()
        {
            var list = new List<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (var i = start; i < end; i++)
                list.Insert(0, temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        public static void AddFirst_LinkedList()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
                list.AddFirst(temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        public static void AddLast_List()
        {
            var list = new List<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (var i = start; i < end; i++)
                list.Add(temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        public static void AddLast_LinkedList()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
                list.AddLast(temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        public static void Enumerate_List()
        {
            var list = new List<Temp>(query);
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            foreach (var item in list)
            {

            }

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        public static void Enumerate_LinkedList()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>(query);
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            foreach (var item in list)
            {

            }

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        //for the fun of it, I tried to time inserting to the middle of 
        //linked list - this is by no means a realistic scenario! or may be 
        //these make sense if you assume you have the reference to middle node

        //insertion to the middle of list
        public static void AddMiddle_List()
        {
            var list = new List<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (var i = start; i < end; i++)
                list.Insert(list.Count / 2, temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        //insertion in linked list in such a fashion that 
        //it has the same effect as inserting into the middle of list
        public static void AddMiddle_LinkedList1()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            LinkedListNode<Temp> evenNode = null, oddNode = null;
            for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
            {
                if (list.Count == 0)
                    oddNode = evenNode = list.AddLast(temp(i));
                else
                    if (list.Count % 2 == 1)
                        oddNode = list.AddBefore(evenNode, temp(i));
                    else
                        evenNode = list.AddAfter(oddNode, temp(i));
            }

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        //another hacky way
        public static void AddMiddle_LinkedList2()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (var i = start + 1; i < end; i += 2)
                list.AddLast(temp(i));
            for (int i = end - 2; i >= 0; i -= 2)
                list.AddLast(temp(i));

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }

        //OP's original more sensible approach, but I tried to filter out
        //the intermediate iteration cost in finding the middle node.
        public static void AddMiddle_LinkedList3()
        {
            var list = new LinkedList<Temp>();
            var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            for (var i = start; i < end; i++)
            {
                if (list.Count == 0)
                    list.AddLast(temp(i));
                else
                {
                    watch.Stop();
                    var curNode = list.First;
                    for (var j = 0; j < list.Count / 2; j++)
                        curNode = curNode.Next;
                    watch.Start();

                    list.AddBefore(curNode, temp(i));
                }
            }

            watch.StopAndPrint();
        }
    }
}

You can see the results are in accordance with theoretical performance others have documented here. Quite clear - LinkedList<T> gains big time in case of insertions. I haven't tested for removal from the middle of list, but the result should be the same. Of course List<T> has other areas where it performs way better like O(1) random access.

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I know this answer... But look at my own tests results:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ListArrayLinkedListTests
{
    class Program
    {
        private static string resultsTemplate = "Test from 1 up to {0}. Time test is {1} min {2} sec {3} millisec";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int maxInteger = 56000000;

            var ArrFill = Array_Fill(maxInteger);

            var LATE = List_AddToEnd(maxInteger);

            Console.WriteLine("Test1. Fill Array with Some size is faster than AddToEnd into the List in {0} times\r\n\r\n", LATE / ArrFill);

            var LLATE = LinkedList_AddToEnd(maxInteger);

            Console.WriteLine("Test2. AddToEnd of List is faster than AddToEnd of LinkedList in {0} times\r\n\r\n", LLATE / ArrFill);

            var ATATE = ArrayTest_AddToEnd(maxInteger/100) * 100;

            Console.WriteLine("Test3. AddToEnd of List is faster than to do resize of array every time in {0} times\r\n\r\n", ATATE / ArrFill);


            maxInteger = 100000;

            var AnotherLT = ListTest_addIntoCenter(maxInteger);

            var AnotherLLT = LinkedList_addIntoCenter(maxInteger);

            Console.WriteLine("Test4. LinkedList faster than List if we need to add some item into the center of list in {0} times\r\n\r\n", AnotherLT / AnotherLLT);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }


        private static int List_AddToEnd(int maxInteger)
        {
            List<int> Lst = new List<int>();
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting ListTest_AddToEnd test...");

            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            for (int i = 0; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                Lst.Add(i);
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }

        private static int LinkedList_AddToEnd(int maxInteger)
        {
            LinkedList<int> Lst = new LinkedList<int>();
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting LinkedList_AddToEnd test...");

            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            for (int i = 0; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                Lst.AddLast(i);
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }

        private static int Array_Fill(int maxInteger)
        {
            int[] arr = new int[maxInteger];
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting Array_Fill test...");
            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            for (int i = 0; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                arr[i] = i;
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }

        private static int ArrayTest_AddToEnd(int maxInteger)
        {
            int[] arr = new int[1];
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting IntData_ArrayTestResizeEveryLoop test...");
            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            for (int i = 0; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                Array.Resize<int>(ref arr, arr.Length + 1);
                arr[i] = i;
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }



        private static int ListTest_addIntoCenter(int maxInteger)
        {
            List<int> Lst = new List<int>();
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting IntData_ListTest test...");

            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            Lst.Add(0);
            Lst.Add(1);

            for (int i = 1; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                Lst.Insert(2, i);
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }

        private static int LinkedList_addIntoCenter(int maxInteger)
        {
            LinkedList<int> Lst = new LinkedList<int>();
            int StartTime, EndTime;
            string result;

            Console.WriteLine("Starting IntData_LinkedListTest test...");

            StartTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            Lst.AddLast(1);
            Lst.AddLast(2);

            var temp = Lst.Find(2);

            for (int i = 2; i < maxInteger; i++)
            {
                Lst.AddAfter(temp, i);
            }

            EndTime = DateTime.Now.Minute * 60 * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Second * 1000 + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

            var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(EndTime - StartTime);
            result = string.Format(resultsTemplate, maxInteger, time.Minutes, time.Seconds, time.Milliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine(result + "\r\n");

            return (EndTime - StartTime);
        }
    }
}

Starting LinkedList_AddToEnd test... Test from 1 up to 56000000. Time test is 0 min 8 sec 584 millisec

Test2. AddToEnd of List is faster than AddToEnd of LinkedList in 28 times Starting IntData_ArrayTestResizeEveryLoop test...

Test from 1 up to 560000. Time test is 6 min 54 sec 68 millisec

Test3. AddToEnd of List is faster than to do resize of array every time in 135760 times

Starting IntData_ListTest test... Test from 1 up to 100000. Time test is 0 min 1 sec 423 millisec

Starting IntData_LinkedListTest test... Test from 1 up to 100000. Time test is 0 min 0 sec 7 millisec

Test4. LinkedList faster than List if we need to add some item into the center of list in 203 times

So the resume is:

  • if we need to get the fastest way, we need to use Arrays. But if we don't know how much will be in this list of elements -- this is the most bad choice, as array resize takes a lot of time.

  • if we need to add some elements to the begin/end of lists(don't know how much elements will be there) -- best choice is List.

  • if we need to add some elements to the center -- best choice is LinkedList

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