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You can't put two __construct functions with unique argument signatures in a PHP class. I'd like to do this:

class Student 
{
   protected $id;
   protected $name;
   // etc.

   public function __construct($id){
       $this->id = $id;
      // other members are still uninitialized
   }

   public function __construct($row_from_database){
       $this->id = $row_from_database->id;
       $this->name = $row_from_database->name;
       // etc.
   }
}

What is the best way to do this in PHP?

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11  
I dream of named constructors and method overload too +1 –  SparK Nov 4 '11 at 17:05
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10 Answers

up vote 145 down vote accepted

I'd probably do something like this:

<?php

class Student
{
    public function __construct() {
    	// allocate your stuff
    }

    public static function withID( $id ) {
    	$instance = new self();
    	$instance->loadByID( $id );
    	return $instance;
    }

    public static function withRow( array $row ) {
    	$instance = new self();
    	$instance->fill( $row );
    	return $instance;
    }

    protected function loadByID( $id ) {
    	// do query
    	$row = my_awesome_db_access_stuff( $id );
    	$this->fill( $row );
    }

    protected function fill( array $row ) {
    	// fill all properties from array
    }
}

?>

Then if i want a Student where i know the ID:

$student = Student::withID( $id );

Or if i have an array of the db row:

$student = Student::withRow( $row );

Technically you're not building multiple constructors, just static helper methods, but you get to avoid a lot of spaghetti code in the constructor this way.

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Looks like you've just answered the question I asked gpilotino. Thanks! Very clear. –  JannieT Nov 9 '09 at 14:48
2  
@gpilotino, overkill because you'd need yet another class, (or method) that would basically just consist of a switch/case decision tree, in the end just doing what I already did in two methods. factories are more useful in situations where you can't easily define the exact constraints of a problem, like creating form elements. but then, that's just my opinion and for the record; I don't claim it to be fact. –  Kris Nov 9 '09 at 16:24
1  
And could not we also make __construct() private, to prevent someone from ocassionally allocating a "non-ininitialized" instance? –  mlvljr Apr 13 '11 at 15:08
2  
@mlvljr: you could, but i'd suggest making it protected instead of private. otherwise you'll most likely run into trouble if you're ever going to extend your class. –  Kris Apr 23 '11 at 23:20
1  
Not really, I generally don't see a problem with allocating empty instances to be able to manually set them up. (actually, I like always being able to do new ClassName();) –  Kris Apr 26 '11 at 10:44
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PHP is a dynamic language, so you can't overload methods. You have to check the types of your argument like this:

class Student 
{
   protected $id;
   protected $name;
   // etc.

   public function __construct($idOrRow){
    if(is_int($idOrRow))
    {
    	$this->id = $idOrRow;
    	// other members are still uninitialized
    }
    else if(is_array($idOrRow))
    {
       $this->id = $idOrRow->id;
       $this->name = $idOrRow->name;
       // etc.  
    }
}
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All that leads to is awesome spaghetti code. But it is indeed probably the easiest way to do it. –  Kris Nov 9 '09 at 14:35
    
If you create your constructors as you would in a statically typed language it will become spaghetti code. But you don't. Creating two constructors with one parameter and no type (no type == any type) for that parameter will not work in any language, anyway (e.g. it won't work to have two Java constructors with one Object parameter each in one class, either). –  Daff Nov 9 '09 at 15:08
    
What i meant is that you're doing different things in the same scope based on outside influence, It's not a bad solution (since it will work), just not the one I would choose. –  Kris Nov 9 '09 at 16:27
    
Well I like your factory approach, too. I just think that you would have to check the variable type at one point after all. –  Daff Nov 9 '09 at 20:51
    
small typo $this->id = $id; should be $this->id = $idOrRow; –  JannieT Nov 19 '09 at 1:39
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Solution of Kris is really nice, but I find the mix of factory and fluent style better:

<?php

class Student
{
    /**
     * Constructor
     */
    public function __construct() {
        // allocate your stuff
    }

    /**
     * Static constructor / factory
     */
    public static function create() {
        $instance = new self();
        return $instance;
    }

    /**
     * FirstName setter - fluent style
     */
    public function withFirstName( $firstName) {
        $this->setFirstName( $firstname);
        return $this;
    }

    /**
     * LastName setter - fluent style
     */
    public function withLastName( $lastName) {
        $this->setLastName( $lastName);
        return $this;
    }

    // create instance
    $student= Student::create()->withFirstName("John")->withLastName("Doe");

}

?>
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1  
Hmmm, I like... –  JannieT Sep 24 '12 at 19:09
    
+1; This type of solution can yield really nice code. Although I would opt for setLastName (or rather all setters) in this solution to return $this instead of having effectively two setters on the same property. –  Kris Aug 26 '13 at 22:23
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public function __construct() {
    $parameters = func_get_args();
    ...
}

$o = new MyClass('One', 'Two', 3);

Now $paramters will be an array with the values 'One', 'Two', 3.

Edit,

I can add that

func_num_args()

will give you the number of parameters to the function.

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How does this solve the problem of knowing what was passed? I think it complicates the issue as instead of having to check the type of the parameter, you have to check if x parameter is set and then the type of it. –  Andrei Serdeliuc Nov 9 '09 at 8:52
    
It doesn't solve the problem to know what type was passed, but it's the way to go for "multiple constructors" in PHP. Type checking is up to OP to do. –  Björn Nov 9 '09 at 8:54
6  
i wonder what happens when a new developer is added to a project with lots of code like this –  Kris Nov 9 '09 at 15:01
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You could do something like this:

public function __construct($param)
{
    if(is_int($param)) {
         $this->id = $param;
    } elseif(is_object($param)) {
     // do something else
    }
 }
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+1 for a very workable solution. However, for the class in mind I'll use @Kris' method. –  JannieT Nov 10 '09 at 4:22
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As of version 5.4, PHP supports traits. This is not exactly what you are looking for, but a simplistic trait based approach would be:

trait StudentTrait {
    protected $id;
    protected $name;

    final public function setId($id) {
        $this->id = $id;
        return $this;
    }

    final public function getId() { return $this->id; }

    final public function setName($name) {
        $this->name = $name; 
        return $this;
    }

    final public function getName() { return $this->name; }

}

class Student1 {
    use StudentTrait;

    final public function __construct($id) { $this->setId($id); }
}

class Student2 {
    use StudentTrait;

    final public function __construct($id, $name) { $this->setId($id)->setName($name); }
}

We end up with two classes, one for each constructor, which is a bit counter-productive. To maintain some sanity, I'll throw in a factory:

class StudentFactory {
    static public function getStudent($id, $name = null) {
        return 
            is_null($name)
                ? new Student1($id)
                : new Student2($id, $name)
    }
}

So, it all comes down to this:

$student1 = StudentFactory::getStudent(1);
$student2 = StudentFactory::getStudent(1, "yannis");

It's a horribly verbose approach, but it can be extremely convenient.

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as stated in the other comments, as php does not support overloading, usually the "type checking tricks" in constructor are avoided and the factory pattern is used intead

ie.

$myObj = MyClass::factory('fromInteger', $params);
$myObj = MyClass::factory('fromRow', $params);
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Looks neat. I'm not familiar with factories. In your example, would $myObj be of the type MyClass? What would the two static functions look like that return a constructed instance of $myObj? –  JannieT Nov 9 '09 at 14:37
1  
I would use seperate methods like Kris did to prevent one big factory method. –  Ikke Nov 9 '09 at 14:59
1  
indeed, @Kris solution is the best. –  gpilotino Nov 9 '09 at 15:45
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As far as I know overloading is not supported in PHP. You can only overload properties' get and set methods with overload(); (http://www.php.net/manual/en/overload.examples.basic.php)

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Another option is to use default arguments in the constructor like this

class Student {

    private $id;
    private $name;
    //...

    public function __construct($id, $row=array()) {
        $this->id = $id;
        foreach($row as $key => $value) $this->$key = $value;
    }
}

This means you'll need to instantiate with a row like this: $student = new Student($row['id'], $row) but keeps your constructor nice and clean.

On the other hand, if you want to make use of polymorphism then you can create two classes like so:

class Student {

    public function __construct($row) {
         foreach($row as $key => $value) $this->$key = $value;
    }
}

class EmptyStudent extends Student {

    public function __construct($id) {
        parent::__construct(array('id' => $id));
    }
}
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1  
now you have two classes with different names but the same functionality just a different signature on the constructor, sounds like a pretty bad idea to me. –  Kris Nov 9 '09 at 15:36
2  
Sounds like classic polymorphism to me, otherwise known as object oriented programming. –  rojoca Nov 9 '09 at 18:59
5  
Creating multiple classes to provide different constructors is indeed a bad idea. Classes that extends other classes should extend, meaning they should have added functionality, thats the point of OOP, not this. –  Jonathan Azulay Aug 12 '12 at 15:09
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You could do something like the following which is really easy and very clean:

public function __construct()    
{
   $arguments = func_get_args(); 

   switch(sizeof(func_get_args()))      
   {
    case 0: //No arguments
        break; 
    case 1: //One argument
        $this->do_something($arguments[0]); 
        break;              
    case 2:  //Two arguments
        $this->do_something_else($arguments[0], $arguments[1]); 
        break;            
   }
}
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why assign func_get_args to a variable and call it again in the next line? would also be better if you only called func_get_args after deciding you need to based on fund_num_args. –  Kris Aug 15 '12 at 20:32
3  
Imho this is the opposite of a clean solution –  Jonathan Azulay Feb 16 '13 at 12:46
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