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I do have a piece of software that I intend to release under the terms of the MIT license. It uses the Java Native Interface, but will only use dynamic linking to load the libraries. It needs however the jni header file jni.h to compile.

Am I allowed to distribute a copy of jni.h under these terms along with my software package?

The file itself says:

/*
 * @(#)jni.h    1.62 06/02/02
 *
 * Copyright 2006 Sun Microsystems, Inc.  All rights reserved.
 * SUN PROPRIETARY/CONFIDENTIAL.  Use is subject to license terms.
 */

/*
 * We used part of Netscape's Java Runtime Interface (JRI) as the starting
 * point of our design and implementation.
 */

/******************************************************************************
 * Java Runtime Interface
 * Copyright (c) 1996 Netscape Communications Corporation. All rights reserved.
 *****************************************************************************/

I don't know which license terms are exactly meant here. Also I don't know what license terms the JRI brings in.

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closed as off topic by EJP, Luc M, M42, hammar, dunni Jun 9 '13 at 8:54

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Off topic, but anybody who is going to compile it will need an entire JDK anyway, not just jni.h. Or you can stipulate that as a requirement. –  EJP Jun 9 '13 at 1:21
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What it means is that you need to read the License Agreement that you agreed to when you downloaded the JDK where you got that file from.

Alternatively use a copy of the jni.h that doesn't say that:

Related:

  • The "OpenJDK and JNI -- licensing" thread on the OpenJDK mailing list discusses this. (Unfortunately the links to the FAQ that supposedly answers these questions are all broken.)
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