Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I saw the source code:

public class Test{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
    counting: 
       for(int k = 0; k < 100; k++)
       for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
         if(i == 9) break counting;
   }    
}

Now I implemented the loops as follows:

public class Test{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      counting: 
      for(int k = 0; k < 100; k++)
      {
         System.out.println(k);//to see how many times the outer loop runs 
         for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
         {            
             if(i == 9) break counting;
         }
     }
}

I got that the outer loop runs once and the inner will run 9 times if I am not mistaken. I have come to the conclusion that this is nested loops that has flow control implemented. All I don't understand is what is the role of counting?

share|improve this question
    
counting: is a label. What did you expect it to do? Perhaps you intended to use continue counting; instead of break; –  Peter Lawrey Jun 8 '13 at 10:51
add comment

closed as too localized by Raedwald, Zaheer Ahmed, Andrew Barber Jun 9 '13 at 12:35

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

counting: is a label. When you call

break counting;

The code will jump to the end of the outer for loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
It should run infinitely. My eclipse is disagreeing though... –  mwerschy Jun 8 '13 at 10:43
    
The code will not jump to the label. It will break out of the loop labelled counting, which means jump to after the loop. –  tom Jun 8 '13 at 10:47
    
Yh just figured that out. I was assuming it would jump to the label... Updating. Java labels are confusing... –  mwerschy Jun 8 '13 at 10:48
    
Its worth noting there is (deliberately) no GOTO in java, which is I think what you're trying to do. –  Richard Tingle Jun 8 '13 at 11:41
add comment

It defines which loop is going to be stopped with the break statement. If you do not use a label, then the inner loop will be interrupted, but the outer one will continue normally.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The break statement by itself lets you break out of a single loop; in most cases this is enough, but there are situations when you must exit from several loops at the same time.

Adding a label to a loop from which you want to break out and referencing that label from a break statement lets you end several nested loops at the same time.

The code from your post is not a good illustration; a better use case is a search in multidimensional array. Let's say that you want to find a pair {row, col} such that array[row][col] == searchTerm. You can do it like this:

int row = -1, col = -1;
searching:
for(int r = 0 ; r != MAX_ROW ; r++) {
    for(int c = 0 ; c != MAX_COL ; c++) {
        if(array[r][c] == searchTerm) {
            row = r;
            col = c;
            break searching;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

When you nested loop, if you want to break a for loop, you should define target to break, so you can you label to solve that. for ex:

lb1:
for(int i = 0; i < 10;i++){
  lb2:
  for(int j = 0; j < 10;j++){ 
     for(int i = 0; i < 10;i++){
         if(a) break lb2; // this will break second loop
         if(b) break lb1; // this will break first loop
     }
  } 
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I hope you can understand!

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        counting: for (int k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            System.out.println(k);
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
                if (i == 9) {
                    System.out.println("I'm going to break!");
                    break counting;    // -----┐
                }                      //      |
            }                          //      |
        }                              //      |
        System.out.println("Broken!"); // <----┘
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.