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I am making a windows phone 8 application. Part of this application requires state to be saved. I am saving it as a string of Json. If I open the application, save some data, exit the application and the load it again, it hangs on either GetFolderAsync or OpenStreamForReadAsync. It does not happen every time, but once it starts hanging, I have to kill the whole emulator and make a new one to start the application again.

I have even tried just making an empty file with no data in it and the problem still persistes.

Below is the code I am using to save and load the data. It does not matter where I call the data load whether it be on application start or on the form load it still breaks.

    private async Task SaveLists()
    {
        //XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ListHolder));

        // Get the local folder.
        StorageFolder local = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;

        // Create a new folder name DataFolder.
        var dataFolder = await local.CreateFolderAsync("DataFolder",
            CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);

        // Create a new file named DataFile.txt.
        var file = await dataFolder.CreateFileAsync("Lists.json",
        CreationCollisionOption.ReplaceExisting);

        string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(Lists, Formatting.Indented);
        byte[] fileBytes = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(json.ToCharArray());

        using (var s = await file.OpenStreamForWriteAsync())
        {
            s.Write(fileBytes, 0, fileBytes.Length);

        }
    }



    private async Task LoadLists()
    {


        // Get the local folder.
        StorageFolder local = Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder;

        if (local != null)
        {
            try
            {
                // Get the DataFolder folder.

                var dataFolder = await local.GetFolderAsync("DataFolder");

                // Get the file.
                var files = dataFolder.GetFilesAsync();
                var file = await dataFolder.OpenStreamForReadAsync("Lists.json");

                string jsonString = "";
                // Read the data.
                using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(file))
                {
                    jsonString = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
                }
                if (jsonString.Length > 0)
                {
                    Lists = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<ItemList>>(jsonString);
                }    
                else
                {
                    Lists = new List<ItemList>();
                }                
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Lists = new List<ItemList>();
            }

        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Did you check if the folder really exists and contains the data you expect it to contain? (I mean, by hand, not programmatically.) –  Vlad Jun 8 '13 at 14:24
    
@Richard - How are you calling your functions? 1) await LoadLists(), or 2) LoadLists().Wait()? –  chue x Jun 8 '13 at 14:26
    
I am calling is like this: await LoadLists(); –  Richard Mannion Jun 8 '13 at 14:59
    
Unfortunately I can't see if the folders and files actually exist as they are on a phone as part of the app. Is there some way to actually see them without code? I did call GetFoldersAsync and I could see the folder in the Quickwatch window –  Richard Mannion Jun 8 '13 at 15:02
    
@RichardMannion: Do you have a Wait or Result anywhere in your calling stack? Or is it all started with an async void event handler? –  Stephen Cleary Jun 8 '13 at 15:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are causing a deadlock by calling Result. I explain this deadlock on my blog and in a recent MSDN article. In summary, await will (by default) attempt to resume execution within a context (the current SynchronizationContext unless it is null, in which case it uses the current TaskScheduler).

In your case, the current SynchronizationContext is the UI context, which is only used by the UI thread. So when you block the UI thread by calling Result, the async method cannot schedule back to the UI thread to complete.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That seems to have solve the issue. There are still timing issues between loading the data and when the GUI actually loads but that should be solvable. I will read your blog thanks. –  Richard Mannion Jun 8 '13 at 15:45
    
For that, I recommend you purposefully design a "loading" state for your UI, have your initial load start in that state, and transition state when the data loads. If you use MVVM, I wrote a NotifyTaskCompletion type that essentially allows you to data-bind to Task results (and get INotifyPropertyChanged events when the Task completes). –  Stephen Cleary Jun 8 '13 at 15:51

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