Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm making a project, and I get stunned with a problem.

I have 3 libraries.h that includes another special library, definitions.h, but in my Main module, i want to include all the libraries just one time, I mean, I want to test if the library definitions.h has already been included, and include it or not depending on the result.

Something like

If !(#include"definitions.h")
(#include"definitions.h")
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by alk, Lol4t0, TheHippo, marko, Achrome Jun 9 '13 at 17:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
In C, the header files must protect themselves from multiple inclusion. Something like this: #ifndef HEADER_H #define HEADER_H ... #endif. –  Vlad Jun 8 '13 at 15:31
1  
One does not #include libraries but headers. libraries are linked, after compilation. And even before the latter we #includeed the librarie(s)' header(s) via the pre-processor. –  alk Jun 8 '13 at 15:39
1  
This is a dupe, isn't it? –  alk Jun 8 '13 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are looking for include guards.

Example,

#ifndef DEFINITIONS_H 
#define DEFINITIONS_H 
...
...

#endif
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for beating me to it. –  Kninnug Jun 8 '13 at 15:33
1  
+1 beating me to it...Add some more explanation...it seems the OP needs it... –  pinkpanther Jun 8 '13 at 15:33
    
+1 for being faster than me. –  Carson Jun 8 '13 at 15:35
    
+1 for not using identifiers starting with underscore+caps (undefined behavior) –  Jens Jun 8 '13 at 16:37
    
Thanks, my problem is solved –  Alessandro Soares Jun 8 '13 at 16:59
#ifndef DEFINITIONS_H
#define DEFINITIONS_H
//lots of code
//
//
//
//
#endif

There's also non-standard #pragma once, see Is #pragma once a safe include guard?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pragma... –  pinkpanther Jun 8 '13 at 15:36

If your header syntax is correct, this should not be a problem. In fact, this is the reason why you write

#ifndef _DEFINITIONS_H
#define _DEFINITIONS_H
[header content]
#endif

So, if your header is conform to C conventions, you should be fine.

share|improve this answer
1  
OT: Interesting to see that I seem to be the only one using leading underscores for my #define. –  Carson Jun 8 '13 at 15:40
1  
This is undefined behavior because you are using an identifier starting with underscore+caps. This should be DEFINITIONS_H. You seem to be the only one who hasn't seen the light yet :-) –  Jens Jun 8 '13 at 16:37
    
Ya. Arn't they kind of meant to be reserved to the compilers namespace? –  EvilTeach Jun 8 '13 at 16:38
1  
IOW, leading underscore appears OK as long as it is not followed by an uppercase letter/underscore. Such could be used in the future by the compiler. Ref: C11 draft 16.8.4: "Any other predefined macro names shall begin with a leading underscore followed by an uppercase letter or a second underscore." –  chux Jun 8 '13 at 16:55
1  
Yes I'm sure. The C Standards forbids the use of reserved identifiers. Underscore+Caps is always reserved for any use = in any namespace, even in the macro namespace. Shaw is wrong because he just wrote it like he found it in the implementation headers in /usr/include. –  Jens Jun 8 '13 at 17:03

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.