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I am trying to parse commandline arguments and execute a function that takes the parameters upon successful extraction of the parameters. I have an object called CurrencyExchangeRunner where the main method is. I have envisioned the structure of the class as follows:

object CurrencyExtractionRunner {
      def main(args:Array[String]){
        parseArgs(args){
            (currencyType,currencyTypeArgs) => 
                 CurrencyExchanger(curencyType,currencyTypeArgs){
                   (exchanger) => exchanger.startExchange
                 }
            }
        }
      }
   }

What I want to accomplish above is to parse the arguments using parseArgs(args), get the (currencyType,currencyTypeArgs) as parameters and pass those into the CurrencyExchanger factory object and then that would return the appropriate exchanger on which I will execute the startExchange method. This is what I have envisioned but I am a little clueless on how would I go about creating this flow. The first thing I tried was to create a trait that parses the command-line args as follows(I am using the jcommander library for the commandline parse):

object Args {
    @Parameter(
      names = Array("-h", "--help"), help = true)
    var help = false
    @Parameter(
      names = Array("-c", "--currency-type"),
      description = "Type of currency exchange that needs to be performed",
      required = true)
    var currencyType: String = null
    @Parameter(
      names = Array("-d", "--denominations"),
      description = "Specific denominations to be used during the exchage")
    var exchangeDenomination: String = null
    @Parameter(
      names = Array("-s", "--someotheroptionalarg"),
      description = "Additional argument for a specific currency exchange")
    var someOtherOptionalArg: String = null

  }


trait ParseUtils {
//How do I do this, take the args and return a function.  
def parseArgs(args: Array[String]){
    val jCommander = new JCommander(Args, args.toArray: _*)
    if (Args.help) {
      jCommander.usage()
      System.exit(0)
    }
    //What do I do now? How do I proceed with executing the function with
    //the specific arguments?
    //What do I need to do to wrap the commandline arguments so that it could 
    //be passed to the next function
  }
}

I am pretty stuck here since I am not sure how would I make the code flexible enough to take the arbitrary sequence of commandline args and execute the next step which is the factory that returns that takes these arguments and returns the correct exchanger.

It will be great if someone could point me in the right direction.

share|improve this question
    
In your example, it is not clear what the relation is between currencyTypeArgs and command line argument (since there is no argument with that name). My advice is don't worry about design patterns for now. Make it work (compile, run, pass the tests) with one currency, then another one, then see how to refactor to be able to add currencies as necessary without having to change too much code. –  huynhjl Jun 8 '13 at 17:09
    
@huynhjl - Yeah, so currencyTypeArgs is my 'abstraction' for the currency arguments. My thought was that currencyTypeArgs would encapsulate the variances of the commandline params, but exactly how would be the question. –  sc_ray Jun 8 '13 at 17:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you'd use such unusual syntax to pass return values to the following methods.

I would go for a simpler solution that looks like

trait ParseUtils {
  //Why would you return a function here? 
  //Is it a strict constraint you need to fulfill?
  def parseArgs(args: Array[String]): (String, String) {
    val jCommander = new JCommander(Args, args.toArray: _*)
    if (Args.help) {
      jCommander.usage()
      System.exit(0)
    }
    //This is the return value of the method, a pair of parameters
    (Args.currencyType, Args.exchangeDenomination)
    //If you need to embed additional params, you should append them to existing one
    // or you could create optional values from the Args members...
    // e.g. (Args.currencyType, Args.exchangeDenomination, Option(Args.someOtherOptionalArg))
    //       with return type (String, String, Option[String])
  }
}

object CurrencyExtractionRunner with ParseUtils {
  def main(args:Array[String]){
    val (currencyType,currencyTypeArgs) = parseArgs(args)
    CurrencyExchanger(currencyType,currencyTypeArgs).startExchange
  }
}

case class CurrencyExchanger(currencyType: String, currencyTypeArgs: String) {
  def startExchange = //implementation details using the costructor arguments
}

Alternative solution

since I prefer parseArgs to be more "functional" I'd change it to

trait ParseUtils {
  def parseArgs(args: Array[String]): Option[(String, String)] {
    val jCommander = new JCommander(Args, args.toArray: _*)
    if (Args.help) {
      jCommander.usage()
      None
    } else 
    Some(Args.currencyType, Args.exchangeDenomination)
  }
}

object CurrencyExtractionRunner with ParseUtils {
  def main(args:Array[String]){
    parseArgs(args).foreach {
      case (currencyType,currencyTypeArgs) => 
        CurrencyExchanger(currencyType,currencyTypeArgs).startExchange
    }
  }
}

case class CurrencyExchanger(currencyType: String, currencyTypeArgs: String) {
  def startExchange = //implementation details using the costructor arguments
}
share|improve this answer
    
-Thanks. This helps. –  sc_ray Jun 9 '13 at 3:18

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