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This is a snippet from a larger chunk of code:

print "> "
$next_move = gets.chomp

case $next_move.include?
when "instructions"
  puts "$next_move is instructions"
else
  puts "$next_move is NOT instructions"
end

Everytime I run it in the terminal, whether I'm using ruby 1.8.7, 1.9.3, or 2.0.0, I get the following error:

test.rb:4:in `include?': wrong number of arguments (0 for 1) (ArgumentError)
from test.rb:4

This code worked last night on a different computer.

Isn't include? checking the contents of that global variable? What other argument should I be passing to it?

I'm kinda stumped here, especially since all I did was move the code from one computer to another.

share|improve this question
    
"This code worked last night on a different computer." err... no. :-) Likely, case "next_move".include? "instructions" did, or case "next_move" when "instructions". – Denis de Bernardy Jun 8 '13 at 17:03
1  
Be very careful using globals: $next_move. They are seldom needed in Ruby code, and, the majority of the time, are a warning sign that you're doing something wrong. – the Tin Man Jun 8 '13 at 18:18
    
@tinman, thanks. I've since improved my coding to avoid them. This is an exercise from a few weeks ago that still has me puzzled. Even though Denis doesn't believe me, honestly, all I did was run the code on a different computer and all of a sudden things that worked no longer seem to work... – user2448377 Jun 9 '13 at 0:03

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/String.html#method-i-include-3F

Returns true if str contains the given string or character.

That means it requires exactly 1 argument, so no wonder it throws ArgumentError when called without arguments.

So the code should be:

if $next_move.include? 'instructions'
  puts '$next_move is instructions'
else
  puts '$next move is NOT instructions'
end
share|improve this answer
    
"Besides, you call include? not on string contained in next_move variable, but on the string 'next_move'." Huh? How does that work? How am I NOT calling on the contents of the variable? – user2448377 Jun 9 '13 at 0:04
    
You did it in the first version of your question. – Marek Lipka Jun 9 '13 at 10:37

Something had to have changed between the two computers you tested this on. If you are wanting to use this as a case statement, you probably had something along the lines of:

next_move = 'instructions'

case next_move
when "instructions"
  puts "$next_move is instructions"
else
  puts "$next_move is NOT instructions"
end

This specifically tests if next_move IS instructions. As an if/else statement:

if next_move.include? 'instructions'
  puts "$next_move is instructions"
else
  puts "$next_move is NOT instructions"
end

See eval.in for more information.

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