Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Whenever I see code like this my head hurts. Can anyone explain what this is doing?

public static class MyExtensionFirADictionary
{
    public static TValue <TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic, TKey key)
    { 
        TValue value;
        if (dic != null && dic.TryGetValue(key, out value))
            return value;

        return default(TValue);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
That won't compile.... –  It'sNotALie. Jun 8 '13 at 20:11
1  
@newStackExchangeInstance correct, it needs a name :) –  Johan Jun 8 '13 at 20:13
    
You forget to name part of this method. This won't compile or course.. –  Soner Gönül Jun 8 '13 at 20:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Laymans terms

//First add a method name to your example extension method so it compiles

public static class MyExtensionFirADictionary
{
   public static TValue GetGenericValue <TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic, TKey key)
   { 
       TValue value;
       if (dic != null && dic.TryGetValue(key, out value))
           return value;

       return default(TValue);
   }
}

now lets start at the beginning:

method signature:

       public static TValue GetGenericValue <TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic, TKey key)

Return an object of type TValue i.e.

Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();

In this case if you called

dict.GetGenericValue("thekey");

TValue would be of type int (note the <string, int> and relate it to you original method

IMPORTANT IDEAS TO UNDERSTAND:

Think of generics as templating. The TValue, TKey are just placeholders which you specify when you do this:

List<myclass>

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
many thanks, this has really helped –  James Radford Jun 9 '13 at 14:08
    
you are welcome - sometimes the hardest part to get is the concept :) –  Paul Sullivan Jun 9 '13 at 16:32

Ignoring the compilation errors, that just says "return the value held against the key, if one - otherwise return the default value of the dictionary", via an extension method. The name isn't shown, but it could be used via something like:

string name = nameLookup.GetValueOrDefault(userId);

Note that the compiler handles a the generics implicitly - the caller doesn't need to specify them.

First, the code checks whether the dictionary is null; if it is null it just returns the default value.

The TryGetValue is a standard dictionary method that does the lookup and returns true if it worked; the code uses that method, and returns the fetched value if there was one - else it explicitly uses the default value for TValue.

share|improve this answer
    
its looks crazy, why is it so complicated? Im not sure how to learn this code. If I just look for tutorial on generics I get silly noddy examples but this is something quite different? –  James Radford Jun 8 '13 at 20:17
    
@James which bit are you finding complicated? –  Marc Gravell Jun 8 '13 at 20:19
    
I struggle with the TValue tbh. –  James Radford Jun 8 '13 at 20:20
    
@JamesRadford, would you find it easier to read if you needed to box/unbox every single value? The whole point of generics is to make things easier. After you get used to it, you'll see it too. Try to start with simpler examples and compare it with "older" way of programming the same logic. I bet you'll start to see the benefits very quickly. –  walther Jun 8 '13 at 20:23
    
@JamesRadford it is for Generics, allowing it to be used with whatever type you'd like. So the extension method will work on any dictionary, be it Dictionary<string, string>, Dictionary<int, string>, etc. –  Johan Jun 8 '13 at 20:23

it allows for the same functionality as the default dictionary behavior, but makes it easier to use.

var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();

//add items to dictionary

so the default would be something like this:

    if(dictionary.ContainsKey("someKey"))
    {
        var value = dictionary["someKey"];
    }

however if it doesn't have that key, and you dont do a ContainsKey check, an exception will be thrown. What the extension method does, it does a TryGetValue, which checks if the key exists, if so returns the value else, returns default(T)

the new use would be (assuming the name of the extension method is GetValue):

var value = dictionary.GetValue("someKey");

a lot shorter and cleaner.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.