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Please, someone explain why the following C program crashes:

void changeChar(char *string);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  char *test = "word";
  changeChar(test);
  return 0;
}

void changeChar(char *string) {
  *string = 'A';
}

while the following code works perfectly:

void changeChar(char *string);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  char test[] = "word";
  changeChar(test);
  return 0;
}

void changeChar(char *string) {
  *string = 'A';
}
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marked as duplicate by Tim Cooper, ouah, GSerg, H2CO3, Jens Jun 8 '13 at 20:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Because test[] is a character array, while the first test is just a character pointer. – Mr Lister Jun 8 '13 at 20:50
1  
@NullPointerException You are not aware the idea of "constants", are you. – user529758 Jun 8 '13 at 20:57
    
("avare of", of course. Damn 5-minute editing limit.) – user529758 Jun 8 '13 at 21:04
    
@H2CO3, can you be more precise about me missing some constant concepts? – NullPointerException Jun 8 '13 at 22:18
    
@NullPointerException I meant, their existence as such. But this question (I mean your comment) shows that in fact you aren't, you just didn't know that string literals were constant (which is somewhat surprising for me, since they are almost always (incorrectly) referred to as "string constants"). – user529758 Jun 8 '13 at 22:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because

char *test = "word";

is not the same as

char test[] = "word";

The first one is string literal it MUST not be changed - changing it causes undefined behavior (as they are immutable).

The second one is a standard (mutable) array of chars.

By the way, the first one must be const char*, not char* (and this will even solve the issue - you'll get compile time error) (thanks to @ouah and @dasblinkenlight - didn't know, that there's a difference in this case)

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It must in C++ but not in C where the string literal is immutable but its type is char[N] and not const char[N]. – ouah Jun 8 '13 at 20:52
1  
I does not have to be const char* in C, only in C++. – dasblinkenlight Jun 8 '13 at 20:53
1  
@dasblinkenlight Technically. But no sane programmer ever writes char *justBecauseItsNotRequiredIDontConstQualifyIt = "breakthis"; – user529758 Jun 8 '13 at 20:59
    
"as they are immutable" -- uh, no. Whether they are "immutable" is undefined, which is precisely why storing into them is undefined behavior. "But no sane programmer ever writes ..." -- wrong; sane (arguably) programmers have been known to write into string constants on systems where they known to be writable (e.g., M$ implementations with the flags set to allow writable string constants). I recently worked on some legacy code that did exactly that ... I didn't change it because it had been working for 18 years. – Jim Balter Jun 9 '13 at 0:33

The first program crashes because it tries to write the memory allocated to a string literal, which is an undefined behavior. The second program copies the string literal into writable memory, fixing the problem.

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Thanks for your comment on my answer. +1 – Kiril Kirov Jun 8 '13 at 20:57
    
+1 for explaining what happens in the second case. – user529758 Jun 8 '13 at 21:00

Because char *test = "word"; defines a pointer to constant string literal that resides within the read-only memory. Trying to modify it results in undefined behavior.

Also have a look at:
What is the difference between char s[] and char *s in C?

And since this is quite common mistake, you'll find many duplicates:
Why do I get a segmentation fault when writing to a string?
C: differences between char pointer and array
Is it possible to modify a string of char in C?

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