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I came across the following code the other day (below) and wondered if it achieves anything of significance in Dart other than the fact that the Class instantiation cannot be changed. I did read some SO posts regarding Java, however they didn't appear conclusive, and don't necessarily apply to Dart. I would not have coded it that way (with final), however perhaps I should. Is there any major significance to using "final" in this instance and what does it achieve?

import 'dart:math';

final _random = new Random();
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From Dart: Up and Running:

If you never intend to change a variable, use final or const, either instead of var or in addition to a type. A final variable can be set only once; a const variable is a compile-time constant.

A local, top-level, or class variable that’s declared as final is initialized the first time it’s used.

So there are three benefits to using final here:

  1. If some code erroneously tries to set _random another time, an error will be generated.
  2. It is also clearer to other programmers (or the same programmer at a later date) that _random is never intended to be changed.
  3. _random is not initialized until it used, so the application will start faster.

For those reasons, I would consider this a good use of final; certainly the code would "work" without it, but it's better this way.

In short, I think the book offers sound advice: "If you never intend to change a variable, use final or const".

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From the documentation :

A local, top-level, or class variable that’s declared as final is initialized the first time it’s used. Lazy initialization of final variables helps apps start up faster.

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Thanks for your answer. I'll tick Darshan's because it's probably more complete. The lazy-initialization is interesting to know. –  Brian Oh Jun 13 '13 at 4:29

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