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i have a class named Foo, this class stores a generic variable. And i have another class named Set. Set is a set of Foo objects, therefore, Set is also a generic class. Each of this classes has lots of attributes and implemented methods, these methods can handle any type.

class Foo<T>{
    private T var;

    public void show(){ (...) }
    (...)
}

class Set<T>{
    private Foo<T>[] things;

    public void showAllElements(){ (...) }
    public int quantityOfElements(){ (...) }
    (...)
}

so that i can make a set of Integers, Strings, Doubles and any type.

But i have an abstract class that i would also want to use as template of the Foo and Set classes, let's call it the Animal class.

abstract class Animal{
    private String voice;
    public void talk(){ (...) }
}

and i want to make a set of Animals, like this:

class FooAnimal<T extends Animal>{
    private T var;

    public void show(){ (...) }
    public void talk(){
        var.talk();
    }
}

class SetOfAnimals<T extends Animal>{
    private FooAnimal<T>[] things;

    public void showAllElements(){ (...) }
    public int quantityOfElements(){ (...) }
    public void makeAllTheAnimalsTalk(){
        for(int i=0; i<things.lenght(); i++)
            things[i].talk();
    }
}

How can i do this without having to copy and paste the code i made for Foo and Set into the classes SetOfAnimals and FooAnimal?

There is a link to an UML diagram to explain the problem:

http://i.imgur.com/r3yE37Y.png?1

how can i do this? what lectures do you recommend me to solve this problem?

i had to edit the problem so it can be more understandable... sorry about that.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Brian Roach, Don Roby, Raedwald, NT3RP, Nathaniel Ford Jun 9 '13 at 2:53

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
After reading this twice I still can't work out what you're really asking. Try posting some code maybe? Also, is this homework? –  Engineer Dollery Jun 8 '13 at 23:04
    
sorry about that, i just edited my question, so it is now more understandable. It is not a homework. I have been working in a java project to make data structures, i have developed a model to work with any type, but i want to implement the same model with a specific type. Sorry about the legibility... –  Bengalaa Jun 8 '13 at 23:31
    
is the question still ambiguous? –  Bengalaa Jun 9 '13 at 19:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Due to the limitations of the Java language in term of inheritance (you can't inherit from more than one class) you'll have to write some plumbing.

As you have a class that is an Animal, a Set and a Foo you'll have to create an interface for each of these classes.

Then you make a new class that implements all:

class FooSetAnimal implements ISet<Animal>, IFoo<Animal>, IAnimal

Then inside this class you can have instances of all the other classes and forward the method calls, this is the plumbing part.

So if a Set has a "size" method you'll do:

class FooSetAnimal implements ...
{
    Set set;
    public int size()
    {
        return set.size();
    }
}

If you want to save some plumbing you can inherit from one of the Set<Animal>, Foo<Animal> or Animal classes to avoid implementing this class' methods.

Anyway without more information this design looks a bit clumsy...

share|improve this answer
    
wow, that's clever, thanks a lot for your answer, it seems to work... I'm giving it a shoot right now, but i ran into a problem: since, technically, it would be composition and not inheritance, i wont have access to the attributes of the variables declared in the class, i've tried to put the attributes on the interface, but i just realized that interfaces can't have attributes, and making the attributes public would be dangerous... Also, in the class FooSetAnimal, should there be a Foo instance and an Animal instance as well? or just the Set instance indicated in the example? –  Bengalaa Jun 9 '13 at 2:53
1  
Attributes should never be exposed directly, but in the interfaces you can define some getters, getA(), getB(), and possibly some setters. And yes in your resulting class you should encapsulate an instance of each of the types you intend to support. This is typically in these kind of use-cases that C++ really shines because you only have to inherit from each and tadaaa it's finished. –  Pragmateek Jun 9 '13 at 13:13

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