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I compiled the code:

namespace TestRegExp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (Regex.IsMatch(args[1], args[0]))
                Console.WriteLine("Input matches regular expression.");
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Input DOES NOT match regular expression.");
        }
    }
}

When I run:

  • TestRegExp.exe ^a\d{5}$ a12345 shows Input matches regular expression.
  • TestRegExp.exe ^a\d{5}$ aa12345 shows Input matches regular expression.
  • TestRegExp.exe ^^a\d{5}$ a12345 shows Input matches regular expression.
  • TestRegExp.exe ^^a\d{5}$ aa12345 shows Input DOES NOT match regular expression.

Why the second option shows Input matches regular expression.?

The '^' symbol represents the string init... alright? and why do I have to repeat this?

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What CLI did you use? It sounds like command line interpretation problem. –  luiges90 Jun 9 '13 at 1:27
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with the regular expression itself.

If you print args[0] to the console, you'll see that it doesn't contain the ^. This is because Windows parses it as an escape character if the expression is not quoted.

If you call it like this:

TestRegExp.exe "^a\d{5}$" aa12345

You'll get the expected result.

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Can you clarify why the ^ is not included? –  Kendall Frey Jun 9 '13 at 1:30
    
There you go... –  Diego Mijelshon Jun 9 '13 at 1:35
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The ^ is used as an escape character in the Windows commandline environment. It tells the command interpreter to treat the next as a literal character (since some characters like <, > and | have special meanings otherwise).

^a evaluates to a when parsed.

^^ evaluates to ^ when parsed.

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