Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

In C-like languages, we are used to having if statements similar to the following:

if(x == 5) {
    //do something
}
else if(x == 7) {
    //do something else
}
else if(x == 9) {
    //do something else
} else {
    //do something else
}

My question is, does the compiler see that if statement that way, or does it end up being interpreted like:

if(x == 5) {
    //do something
}
else {
    if(x == 7) {
        //do something
    }
    else {
        if(x == 9) {
            //do something
        }
        else {
            //do something else
        }
    }
}

EDIT: I realized that while the question made sense in my head, it probably sounded rather stupid to the rest of the general populace. I was more referring to how the AST would look and if there was any special AST cases for 'else-if' statements or if it would be compiled as a cascading if/else block.

share|improve this question
13  
Neither is converted to the other. Each is converted to an internal format which happens to be the same. What is your practical programming question? – Raymond Chen Jun 9 '13 at 2:38
1  
The C language will compile to different representations depending on the target/compiler/etc. – maxwellb Jun 9 '13 at 2:44
2  
@DamonSwayn, I'd be interested to hear what you think it would mean if the compiler were to interpret it one way vs the other; in other words, what meaningful effect would the alternative interpretations have? The truth is there is no difference between the two interpretions -- they are equivalent. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 9 '13 at 2:57
7  
Where's the difference? There's absolutely no difference between your two variants, aside from purely cosmetic ones. Both versions have immediately identical semantics. By the time this code gets to the point where the compiler will start figuring out its meaning, both will be represented identically. For this reason, it is not clear what your question is about. – AnT Jun 9 '13 at 4:04
2  
The question asks whether introducing extra braces (blocks) makes a difference in how the compiler parses complex if-statements, possibly having an effect on the resulting object code. Experienced C/C++ programmers may find the answer obvious, but closing it as ambiguous, vague or overly broad is not justified at all. Voting to reopen. – jogojapan Jun 10 '13 at 7:04

They are equivalent to a C compiler. There is no special syntax else if in C. The second if is just another if statement.


To make it clearer, according to C99 standard, if statement is defined as

selection-statement:
    if (expression) statement
    if (expression) statement else statement
    switch (expression) statement

and a compound-statement is defined as

compound-statement:
    {block-item-list(opt) }
block-item-list:
    block-item
    block-item-list block-item
block-item:
    declaration
    statement

When a compiler frond-end tries to understand a source code file it often follows these steps:

  1. Lexical analysis: turn the plain-text source code into a list of 'tokens'
  2. Semantic analysis: parse the token list and generate an abstract syntax tree (AST)

The tree is then passed to compiler middle-end (to optimize) or back-end (to generate machine code)

In your case this if statement

if(x == 7) {
    //do something else
} else if(x == 9) {
    //do something else
} else {
    //do something else
}

Is parsed as a selection-statement inside a selection-statement,

    selection-stmt
    /     |      \
 exp     stmt     stmt
  |       |        |
 ...     ...    selection-stmt
                /      |      \
              exp     stmt    stmt
               |       |       |
              ...     ...     ...

and this one

if(x == 7) {
    //do something else
} else {
    if(x == 9) {
        //do something else
    } else {
        //do something else
    }
}

is the same selection-statement inside a compound-statement inside a selection-statement:

    selection-stmt
    /     |      \
 exp     stmt     stmt
  |       |        |
 ...     ...    compound-stmt
                      |
                block-item-list
                      |
                  block-item
                      |
                     stmt
                      |
                selection-stmt
                /      |      \
               exp    stmt    stmt
                |      |       |
               ...    ...     ...

So they have different ASTs. But it makes no differences for the compiler backend: as you can see in the AST, there is no structural changes.

share|improve this answer
4  
When answering a question at this level, it is disingenuous to use an acronym like AST without explaining what it means. – TonyK Jun 9 '13 at 8:12
1  
@TonyK It is also disingenuous from the part of OP to expect the answerer to be an alive Wikipedia. Typing "AST" into Google shouldn't hurt, should it. – user529758 Jun 10 '13 at 7:35
    
branching, another big topic for C++ users – user2384250 Jun 14 '13 at 2:12

In both C and C++ enclosing a statement into a redundant pair of {} does not change the semantics of the program. This statement

a = b;

is equivalent to this one

{ a = b; }

is equivalent to this one

{{ a = b; }}

and to this one

{{{{{ a = b; }}}}}

Redundant {} make absolutely no difference to the compiler.

In your example, the only difference between the first version and the second version is a bunch of redundant {} you added to the latter, just like I did in my a = b example above. Your redundant {} change absolutely nothing. There's no appreciable difference between the two versions of code you presented, which makes your question essentially meaningless.

Either clarify your question, or correct the code, if you meant to ask about something else.

share|improve this answer
5  
It depends on the statement. At least in C, if the statement includes a compound literal, it creates an object whose lifetime ends at the end of the nearest enclosing block. In that case, enclosing a single statement with braces does make a difference. In this particular case, though, you're right that it doesn't matter, particularly since the substatements of an if statement are blocks (even if they're not compound statements). – Keith Thompson Jun 9 '13 at 6:27
2  
Furthermore, { } creates a new scope. – user529758 Jun 10 '13 at 6:56
3  
@H2CO3: Yes, but it doesn't matter within the context of the question. The whole point here is that the the new scope is redundant if it does not contain anything that is somehow tied to that new scope or depends on that new scope. A redundant scope is completely inconsequential. The "transformation" the OP's used creates exactly that - a completely inconsequential redundant scope. The only possibility for "non-redundancy" here is what Keith noted in his comment - for example, a compound literal in ifs condition. – AnT Jun 10 '13 at 7:31

The two snippets of code are, in fact, identical. You can see why this is true by realizing that the syntax of the "if" statement is as follows:

if <expression>
    <block>
else
    <block>

NOTE that <block> may be surrounded by curly braces if necessary.

So, your code breaks down as follows.

// if <expression>
if (x == 5)

// <block> begin
{
    //do something
}
// <block> end

// else
else

// <block> begin
if(x == 7) {
    //do something else
}
else if(x == 9) {
    //do something else
} else {
    //do something else
}
// <block> end

Now if you put curly braces around the block for the "else", as is allowed by the language, you end up with your second form.

// if <expression>
if (x == 5)

// <block> begin
{
    //do something
}
// <block> end

// else
else

// <block> begin
{
    if(x == 7) {
        //do something else
    }
    else if(x == 9) {
        //do something else
    } else {
        //do something else
    }
}
// <block> end

And if you do this repeatedly for all "if else" clauses, you end up with exactly your second form. The two pieces of code are exactly identical, and seen exactly the same way by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, the syntax of an if statement doesn't refer to "blocks". See Naruil's answer, which correctly cites the actual syntax. – Keith Thompson Jun 9 '13 at 6:24
1  
It's just a simplification to explain the concept, without getting into the actual grammar (and muddying the waters). I thought it would help him see the big picture (the structure of his code). – Ziffusion Jun 9 '13 at 6:50

Closer to the first one, but the question doesn't exactly fit.

When a programs compiled, it goes through a few stages. The first stage is lexical analysis, then the second stage is syntactic analysis. Lexical analysis analyses the text, separating it into tokens. Then syntactic analysis looks at the structure of the program, and constructs an abstract syntax tree (AST). This is the underlying syntactic structure that's created during a compilation.

So basically, if and if-else and if-elseif-else statements are all eventually structures into an abstract syntax tree (AST) by the compiler.

Here's the wikipedia page on ASTs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_syntax_tree

edit: And actually, and if/if else statement probably forms something closer to the second one inside the AST. I'm not quite sure, but I wouldn't be surprised if its represented at an underlying level as a binary tree-like conditional branching structure. If you're interested in learning more in depth about it, you can do some research on the parsing aspect of compiler theory.

share|improve this answer
    
Closer to the first one, closer to the second one, and you're not sure. Not an answer. – EJP Jun 10 '13 at 1:17
1  
It's definitely an answer. I'm not quite sure how it's parsed, but the heart of it lies in the syntactic structure of a parse tree, which is the definitely the direction to go if the poster wants to get in-depth about how the compiler handles it. – Nathan Jun 10 '13 at 1:31

Note that although your first statement is indented according to the if-else "ladder" convention, actually the "correct" indentation for it which reveals the true nesting is this:

if(x == 5) {
    //do something
} else 
  if(x == 7) {              // <- this is all one big statement
    //do something else
  } else 
    if(x == 9) {            // <- so is this
      //do something else
    } else {
      //do something else
    }

Indentation is whitespace; it means nothing to the compiler. What you have after the first else is one big if statement. Since it is just one statement, it does not require braces around it. When you ask, "does the compiler read it that way", you have to remember that most space is insignificant; the syntax determines the true nesting of the syntax tree.

share|improve this answer
    
Just note that although this indentation reveals the actual structure, I surely wouldn't recommend using it. – ugoren Jun 9 '13 at 6:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.