Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have used a method in a reference book about fortran codes calling c codes. The method is that if your function name in the c codes are capitalized, you may not make additional changes in your fortran code. The following is my code.

Source1.f90:

program main
implicit none
call c_subprint()
endprogram

ccode.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#ifdef _cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
void _stdcall C_SUBPRINT()
 {
    int a;
    printf("%s\n","kk");
    scanf("%d",&a);
 }
 #ifdef _cplusplus
 }
 #endif

The error message is that the main function cannot find out _C_SUBPRINT(LNK2019). But I have already added the .lib generated by the c code to the fortran code. And my code is almost the same as that in the reference book. what is wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Capitalize the function call in the fortran code to match the C code. – Floris Jun 9 '13 at 3:05
    
How do you compile and link the code? – Floris Jun 9 '13 at 3:06
    
Thank you for your answer. The c code will generate a .lib file. And the fortran code use it. Just now I capitalize the function call in the fortran code as you told me. But still the same error occurs. – John Jun 9 '13 at 3:23
    
Can you give the exact code you use for compiling and linking - what compilers, what flags, what command line strings, what platforms, ... – Floris Jun 9 '13 at 3:27
1  
vs2010 is an ide, not a compiler. If you use GCC compilers, you can do just gfortran cfile.c fortranfile.f90 and it just works. – Vladimir F Jun 9 '13 at 16:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

From the inclusion of _stdcall I deduce you are probably using a Windows platform. Unfortunately I'm working on a Mac, so things may not be exactly the same. However, the following works for me (small changes from your code) to get a mix of Fortran and C code working together. Note - on my Mac, the gcc compiler does not include Fortran, so I used a separate Fortran compiler gfortran which I downloaded from a link at http://hpc.sourceforge.net - where instructions for installation could also be found.

program src1.f90:

program main
implicit none
call C_SUBPRINT()
endprogram

program ccode.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
void c_subprint_()
 {
    printf("hello world!\n");
 }

Note I took out the #ifdef sections - I was using pure C, so it was not needed; more importantly, note the underscore after the function name

I compiled these two modules as follows:

gcc -c ccode.c -o ccode.o
gfortran src1.f90 ccode.o -o hello

After which I can run

./hello

And get the expected output:

hello world!

Without the underscore, the linker complains about unknown symbols. There is an option in the compiler to turn off "name mangling" with the underscore. You can check your specific compiler to see how that would be done - but that's almost certainly the problem you are having.

share|improve this answer

Different Fortran compilers generate calls differently. Many add underscores to routine names to avoid name conflicts with C-code. Its very hard to say whether or not you should exactly follow the example of an unnamed reference book. In the past, to mix Fortran and C, you have to understand some of the compiler internals. Here the Fortran compiler appears to have added an underscore to the start of the name. You could probably fix the problem by adding that in your C++ code. But that won't be portable and in principle could change with compiler versions. There is a better way: the Fortran ISO_C_Binding. This is part of the Fortran language standard and therefore standard and portable. Examples are given in the gfortran manual in the Chapter "Mixed-Language Programming" and in other questions on Stackoverflow.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "you have to understand some of the compiler internals"!! This is the heart of the issue. – Floris Jun 9 '13 at 14:08
1  
@Floris, my point is that with the ISO_C_Binding one no longer has to understand compiler internals. And this solution is portable. This is an example of non-portability: you found that you had trailing underscore, while John's linker is looking for a routine with a leading underscore. Figuring out how the routine name isn't so bad ... argument passing can get more complicated. – M. S. B. Jun 9 '13 at 20:09
    
I get it now, thanks. I am a "very old Fortran" guy... and never knew this issue had finally been addressed. I will try to learn more about this! – Floris Jun 9 '13 at 23:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.