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I am very confused about this problem regarding openmp in fortran. Specifically, when I write the program like this:

PROGRAM TEST

  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: i,j,l
  INTEGER :: M(2,2)
  i=2
  j=2
  l=41


  !$OMP PARALLEL SHARED(M),PRIVATE(l,i,j)
  !$OMP DO 

    DO i=1,2
      DO j=1,2
       DO l=0,41
      M(i,j)=M(i,j)+1
    ENDDO
    ENDDO
    ENDDO      
    !$OMP END DO
    !$OMP END PARALLEL


    END PROGRAM TEST

After compiling by: ifort -openmp test.f90, it works well, and the results of M(1,1) is 42 as expected.

However, when I only adjust the order of sum over l and {i,j}, like the following:

PROGRAM TEST

  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: i,j,l
  INTEGER :: M(2,2)
  i=2
  j=2
  l=41


  !$OMP PARALLEL SHARED(M),PRIVATE(l,i,j)
  !$OMP DO 

  DO l=0,41
    DO i=1,2
      DO j=1,2
      M(i,j)=M(i,j)+1
    ENDDO
    ENDDO
    ENDDO      
    !$OMP END DO
    !$OMP END PARALLEL


    END PROGRAM TEST

After compiling by: ifort -openmp test.f90, it doesn't work well. In fact, when you run a.out several times, the results of M(1,1) seems to be random. Does anyone know what's the problem? Also, if I want to obtain the right results, under the summing order:

DO l=0,41
    DO i=1,2
      DO j=1,2

what part should I modify this code?

Many thanks for any help.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a race condition. Threads with different l are trying to use the same element M(i,j). You can use tools like Intel Inspector or Oracle Thread Analyzer to find it (I checked with Intel). The best thing to do is using your original order. You can also use reduction, but be careful with larger arrays:

PROGRAM TEST
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: i,j,l
  INTEGER :: M(2,2)

  M = 0
  !$OMP PARALLEL DO PRIVATE(l,i,j),reduction(+:M)
  DO l = 0, 41
    DO i = 1, 2
      DO j = 1, 2
        M(i,j) = M(i,j) + 1
      END DO
    END DO
  END DO
  !$OMP END PARALLEL DO
  print *, M

END PROGRAM
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I have tried reduction in my real program, but I always gets the error "segmentation error", even I have set "ulimit -s unlimited". How to set this problem?Thanks. –  Hui Zhang Jun 10 '13 at 15:11
    
In ifort you may try -heap-arrays n_kB but they do not recommend it with OpenMP. –  Vladimir F Jun 10 '13 at 16:42
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There are many problems with your approach. First of all, the missing initialization of your array M. Inside your loop, you issue

M(i,j) = M(i,j) + 1

without having given any initial value to M(i,j). So the algorithm is indeterministic even in the serial case, and it is just a matter of lack, that you obtain the right result with any specific compiler or any specific summation order.

Addintionally, if you parallelize the loop over l, like

!$OMP PARALLEL DO SHARED(M),PRIVATE(l,i,j)
DO l = 0, 41
  DO i = 1, 2
    DO j = 1, 2
      M(i,j) = M(i,j) + 1
    END DO
  END DO
END DO

every thread will have an own nested loop construct over i and j covering all matrix elements. Consequently, different threads will access the same elements of the matrix at the same time. The result again being indeterministic. You could of course, try to solve the issue by ensuring via OpenMP constructs, that the threads wait on each other before accessing a certain matrix element. However, that would make the algorithm definitely too slow. The best you can do in this case, in my oppinion, to parallelize over the matrix elements (the loops over i and j).

By the way, the lines

i=2
j=2
l=41

in your code are superfluous, since you immediately use them as loop variables so that their will be overwritten anyway.

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1  
won't this perform badly requiring a bunch of overhead for the threads to wait to access the shared variable? –  george Jun 9 '13 at 13:38
    
@george: Thanks for the comment (+1), it made me realized that my previous solution was also affected by race conditions. I corrected now my post, being hopefully correct this time. –  Bálint Aradi Jun 9 '13 at 16:18
    
One of the nice features of Fortran is the way it treats arrays, therefore allowing things like OpenMP reduction over array variables (as used in Vladimir's answer) - a feature that many people miss in OpenMP for C/C++. –  Hristo Iliev Jun 9 '13 at 22:02
    
Thanks you so much for all your answers, I will see whether I can loop i,j in my real program. Thanks again for the help. –  Hui Zhang Jun 10 '13 at 15:14
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