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I have the following class, which is supposed to represent an 8 bit signed char.

class S8
{
private:
    signed char val;
public:
    S8 & operator=(const signed char other)
    {
        if ((void*)this != (void*)&other)
        {
            val = other;
        }
        return *this;
    }
    operator signed char() {signed char i; i = (signed char) val; return i;}
    void write (OutputArray & w)
    {
        /* This function is the whole purpose of this class, but not this question */
    }
};

However, when I assign a negative number to one of its objects,

S8 s;
char c;

s = -4;
c = -4;

printf("Results: %d, %s\n",s,c);

I get "Results: 252, -4" from the printf. Is there any way to modify the class such that cases like this will see the behaviour of a signed char, rather than the unsigned char behaviour I am getting?

Thanks!

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3  
Undefined behaviour: A good reason not to use printf. –  chris Jun 9 '13 at 4:11
3  
And your overloaded assignment operator is really odd. Your address check will never be true (see copy-swap anyway), and you shouldn't even need to overload it. Just have a conversion constructor from signed char. Your conversion operator could just return val; as well. –  chris Jun 9 '13 at 4:14
    
The printf was just a sanity check to ensure I didn't lose the sign. I figured I'd see the negative number, not it's two's complement. Good to know it was just me not knowing how to use printf, thanks! I'll look into the assignment operator...it was a copy/paste from a different SO question and I didn't put much thought into it –  SVC Jun 9 '13 at 4:22
    
Why would you create a class for signed char? It seems to be pointless. –  Pavel Strakhov Jun 9 '13 at 7:36
    
for %s format you must pass const char* pointing to 0-terminated string. for char you must use %c. This way you have UB. And passing non-POD as your class is UB too –  Balog Pal Jun 9 '13 at 10:56
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want is an implicit conversion from a signed char to an S8 object; and this is accomplished with a non-default copy-constructor. If a copy-constructor taking a signed char is defined, then compilers will use this for implicit conversions (assuming the copy-constructor is not defined as "explicit"). So, for your example:

class S8
{
private:
    signed char val;
public:
    //default constructor
    S8() : val(0) {}

    //default copy-constructor
    S8(const S8& rhs) : val(rhs.val) {}

    //allow implicit conversions (non-default copy constructor)
    S8(const signed char rhs) : val(rhs) {}

    //allow implicit conversions
    operator signed char() { return val; }
};    

int main()
{
  S8 s;
  signed char c;

  s = -4;
  c = -4;

  std::cout << (int) s << std::endl;
  std::cout << (int) c << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! I didn't know about implicit conversions, which made it difficult to find information on :) now I know. –  SVC Jun 9 '13 at 22:00
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Your code makes no sense at all, while the behavior you experience is completely arbitrary as printf must not be used that way. (did you at least turn on warnings in your compiler? Many would flag your error!)

Besides that, your in and out converters did what you were after, just phrased badly. In op= the rhs is char, it can not possibly be on the same address of your class so you can just go ahead and storing it.

The implicit conversion op also needs no fuss just return the member.

Why you need this is unclear, possibly you should read up on implicit conversions and custom op= stuff. As it holds all kinds of danger, and should only be used by those clearly know when the conversions will apply, that the client code is such to welcome that, and the client code is unlikely to fall in a pit with the conversion present.

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The code does make sense. I need a signed char type that has a write() function associated to it...and having it associated together in a class looks prettier than a standalone function. I didn't know about implicit conversions, and that was the topic I needed directed to. –  SVC Jun 9 '13 at 22:02
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