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I came across this type function in an example code, and it looks widely used. But I cannot figure out how to call this, or infact, what pattern it represents.

 l = function (a1){
  someVar = {
    someFn: function(a2){
       console.log(a1);
       console.log(a2);
    }
  }
}

How would i go about executing someFn? Does this have something to do with closures?

UPDATE:

This is how the code is being used. As @joseph-the-dreamer guessed, it is being used as part of a module, where:

  App.module("Module", function(a1) {
      someVar = {
        someFn: function(a2){
           console.log(a1);
           console.log(a2);
        }
      }
  })
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3 Answers

From it's current state, you need to call l first to set someVar to access someFn. Otherwise, you can't access someFn at all.

But without any variable declaration of someVar, calling l will create an implied global someVar. Implied globals isn't a good practice. You should declare someVar somewhere, even if you mean it to be a global.

var someVar;

l = function (a1){
  someVar = {
    someFn: function(a2){
       console.log(a1);
       console.log(a2);
    }
  }
}

l(1);
someVar.someFn(2);

//1
//2

You can also return someVar from calling l to access someVar. Note that this time, someVar is a local variable in l.

var l = function (a1){
  var someVar = {
    someFn: function(a2){
      console.log(a1);
      console.log(a2);
    }
  }
  return someVar;
}

l(1).someFn(2);

As for pattern, I think what you have there is an incomplete form of the module pattern. Usually, module pattern wraps things in an IIFE, and returns an object as an interface to the module.

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2  
What if someVar is declared above l's assignment? –  Aiias Jun 9 '13 at 4:42
    
@Aiias good point. I overlooked that. –  Joseph the Dreamer Jun 9 '13 at 4:42
    
is there any way to do this with out using global variables? –  pinkpanther Jun 9 '13 at 4:50
    
@pinkpanther return someVar as a result of calling l. –  Joseph the Dreamer Jun 9 '13 at 4:52
1  
@JosephtheDreamer the op also needs "what pattern it represents." –  pinkpanther Jun 9 '13 at 5:07
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If someVar is not a variable in a scope outside of l(), then you cannot call someFn(), since someFn() is a private member function of someVar.

Otherwise, if you do have access to someVar, then you can call someFn() like this someVar.someFn(). Note that in this case, the console.log(a1) will behave strangely since a1 is has been assigned only since the last time l() was called.

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At its current state, without any someVar declaration, calling l would make a global someVar. You can still access it somehow. –  Joseph the Dreamer Jun 9 '13 at 4:46
    
@JosephtheDreamer - I do not think what you are saying is true. Try running the above code with alert(typeof someVar); after it. You get undefined. –  Aiias Jun 9 '13 at 4:49
1  
Then how do you suppose this could run? –  Joseph the Dreamer Jun 9 '13 at 4:51
1  
@JosephtheDreamer - My bad ;) Forgot to run l() first :). Running l() is required for this implicit global declaration to be true. –  Aiias Jun 9 '13 at 4:52
    
since a1 is not declared in any scope at that time. That isn't true, it is in the closure scope due to the call to l(). –  Chad Jun 9 '13 at 5:08
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In JavaScript there are 2 types of variables: global and local.

//local
var foo = "foo";

//global
bar = "bar";

From what I see in your sample, l is a global variable that is used to store an anonymous function. Inside this function there is a global variable named someVar that stores an object that has a local variable named someFn that stores an anonymous function.

To execute someFn, you must do the following:

l("Foo");               //This does not output anything
someVar.someFn("Bar");  //This will output "Foo" and then "Bar"

When you call l("Foo");, you are creating the global variable someVar. This in turn means you can use someVar anywhere even outside of the scope of the anonymous function stored in l. You are using closures for the argument a1.

A global variable can be used anywhere and I humbly suggest to limit its usage as it will pollute the global scope which means that it is quite error prone.

An approach that does not use global variables would be better. Little example here:

"use strict";

var l = function(a1) { //constructor
  var _a1 = a1; //private variable
  this.someFn = function(a2) { //public method
     console.log(_a1);
     console.log(a2);
  };
};

var object1 = new l("Foo");
var object2 = new l("Foo");
object1.someFn(1); //outputs "Foo" and then 1
object2.someFn(2); //outputs "Foo" and then 2
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the op also needs "what pattern it represents." –  pinkpanther Jun 9 '13 at 5:07
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