Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following data

x y z

1 2 a

1 2

data[2,3] is a factor but nothing shows, In the data, it has a lot rows like this way.How to delete the row when the z has nothing? I mean deleting the rows such as the second row.

output should be

x y z

1 2 a
share|improve this question
4  
Can you please post the output of dput(head(yourdataframe)) to make your sample data easy to copy and paste. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 9 '13 at 6:42
    
output shows above, please help! –  Dryad Jun 9 '13 at 6:56
1  
probably data[ ! data$z=="" , ] but you didn't post your data as @AnandaMahto asked (pasting the output from dput(head(data))) so we dont know. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jun 9 '13 at 7:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

OK. Stabbing a little bit in the dark here.

Imagine the following dataset:

mydf <- data.frame(
  x = c(.11, .11, .33, .33, .11, .11),
  y = c(.22, .22, .44, .44, .22, .44),
  z = c("a", "", "", "f", "b", ""))
mydf
#      x    y z
# 1 0.11 0.22 a
# 2 0.11 0.22  
# 3 0.33 0.44  
# 4 0.33 0.44 f
# 5 0.11 0.22 b
# 6 0.11 0.44  

From the combination of your title and your description (neither of which seems to fully describe your problem), I would decode that you want to drop rows 2 and 3, but not row 6. In other words, you want to first check whether the row is duplicated (presumably only the first two columns), and then, if the third column is empty, drop that row. By those instructions, row 5 should remain (column "z" is not blank) and row 6 should remain (the combination of columns 1 and 2 is not a duplicate).

If that's the case, here's one approach:

# Copy the data.frame, "sorting" by column "z"
mydf2 <- mydf[rev(order(mydf$z)), ]
# Subset according to your conditions
mydf2 <- mydf2[duplicated(mydf2[1:2]) & mydf2$z %in% "", ]
mydf2
#      x    y z
# 3 0.33 0.44  
# 2 0.11 0.22  

^^ Those are the data that we want to remove. One way to remove them is using setdiff on the rownames of each dataset:

mydf[setdiff(rownames(mydf), rownames(mydf2)), ]
#      x    y z
# 1 0.11 0.22 a
# 4 0.33 0.44 f
# 5 0.11 0.22 b
# 6 0.11 0.44  
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That is what I want –  Dryad Jun 9 '13 at 8:55
1  
@Dryad, if this is what you're looking for, do consider up-voting or accepting the answer. Also, welcome to SO, but please note that in order to get better quality answers--there are a lot of folk here more than happy to help out!--please take time to frame a proper question that highlights all dimensions of your problem. Also, be sure to read how to make a great reproducible example. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 9 '13 at 9:00
1  
+1 @AnandaMahto excellent guess! –  agstudy Jun 9 '13 at 9:08

Some example data:

df = data.frame(x = runif(100), 
                y = runif(100),
                z = sample(c(letters[0:10], ""), 100, replace = TRUE))

> head(df)
          x          y z
1 0.7664915 0.86087017 a
2 0.8567483 0.83715022 d
3 0.2819078 0.85004742 f
4 0.8241173 0.43078311 h
5 0.6433988 0.46291916 e
6 0.4103120 0.07511076  

Spot row six with the missing value. You can subset using a vector of logical's (TRUE, FALSE):

df[df$z != "",]

And as @AnandaMahto commented, you can even check against multiple conditions:

df[!df$z %in% c("", " "),]
share|improve this answer
    
I might upvote if you remove your recommendation to -which. Also, I'm still not convinced this covers the possible complexity of the (poorly presented) question. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 9 '13 at 7:37
    
This is my second time to ask question here, so I don't understand dput(head(data))) –  Dryad Jun 9 '13 at 7:51
    
@Dryad Try ? dput. –  Thomas Jun 9 '13 at 7:56
    
@AnandaMahto what is your issue with -which? It is kind of superfluous, is that it? –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 9 '13 at 7:56
    
It probably isn't a problem here, but try something like df[-which(df$z == " "), ] (where a space doesn't exist as a possible value, as in your dataset) compared to df[!df$z %in% c(" "), ]. I've used c() in the %in% example to also show that multiple values can be checked against, unlike when using ==. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 9 '13 at 8:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.