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int x; //line 1
int x; //line 2
int main()
{
    return 0;
}

Both line 1 and line 2 declare as well as define the variable x. But the code doesn't give any linker errors. Why is it so?

Compilation fails only when I initialize x in both the lines.

int x=3;
int x=3;
int main(){
return 0;
}

I thought compilation would fail in code 1 because of multiple definition of variable x.

I'm new to programming, so please pardon any mistakes.

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2  
possible duplicate of In C, is it valid to declare a variable multiple times? –  Elazar Jun 9 '13 at 7:07
    
I already understand we can declare an identifier more than once. I was looking for multiple definitions of variable. This is the reason, I didn't find the duplicate question. Thanks for the link, it does answer my question to some extent.<br/>It works because the definitions in my code are tentative in nature. So they are initially taken as declarations and upon failing to find any other instance of definition, they are combined into a single definition. –  aste123 Jun 9 '13 at 7:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It works because the definitions in my code are tentative in nature. So they are initially taken as declarations and upon failing to find any other instance of definition, they are combined into a single definition.

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It sometimes depend on the compiler version.. Some compilers will allow this but some will not for example turbo C++ will allow such declaration but mingw ( gcc / g++ ) will not allow this in both cases.

Hope it helps

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Are you sure there is such a case for minGW? I've just been able to compile this with gcc –  Nobilis Jun 9 '13 at 7:07
1  
gcc -Wall -Werror --pedantic-errors -std=c99 compiles fine. –  Elazar Jun 9 '13 at 7:09
    
Actually I tried on gcc. –  aste123 Jun 9 '13 at 7:11
    
I can send you the screenshots i have tested it on gcc compiler –  Adil Sarwar Jun 9 '13 at 7:12
2  
The OP asked about C. not C++. There's a huge difference. –  Elazar Jun 9 '13 at 7:21

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