Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have never worked with #if, #ifdef, #ifndef, #else, #elif and #endif.

As I was going through some source-codes, I found an extensive use of these directives. Did some reading on conditional-preprocessors but found no clue like how are they different from normal conditional statements. So I was wondering what is the advantage of following code:

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    int i = 0;

    #if i == 0
         std::cout<<"This";
    #else
         std::cout<<"That";
    #endif
    return 0;
}

over this:

#include<iostream>
int main()
{
    int i = 0;

    if (i == 0)
         std::cout<<"This";
    else
         std::cout<<"That";
    return 0;
}

Also, when to-use/not-to-use conditional-preprocessor?

share|improve this question
1  
For starters, if is evaluated at run-time and #if is evaluated before compile-time. –  Aiias Jun 9 '13 at 7:02
4  
@xaxxon: Can you explain how that link is relevant? –  Blender Jun 9 '13 at 7:03
1  
In this (and many) cases, if you turn on optimization in your compiler, they'll give the same resulting binary. Your first example has a syntax problem though, since an #if cannot work with regular variables. –  Joachim Isaksson Jun 9 '13 at 7:09
1  
@xaxxon I don't see that. The question asks which one should be used when, but that's a perfectly legitimate, answerable question rather than a discussion starter. –  delnan Jun 9 '13 at 7:10
2  
Your code isn't C. The C++ community probably has different feelings about this issue. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 9 '13 at 7:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Conditional preprocessor doesn't work like in your first example.

It's working with constants, you see? At compile time, it looks at the various conditions and puts in/omits source code according to it.

For example:

#define HAS_COMPARISON

int main() {
    #ifdef HAS_COMPARISON
        int i = 0;
        if(i == 0) std::cout << "This";
        else
    #else
        std::cout << "That";
    #endif
}

With the define set, it will set the variable i and perform the comparison...in short, it will output This. If you comment that define, the entire block will not be in your program which means that it will always output That, without ever setting the variable or doing the comparison.

That's the most common use of preprocessor defines. You can also define values and compare those to have variable behaviour with the same define, but that's another issue.

Once more: Conditional preprocessor is evaluated at compile time, variable conditions are evaluated at runtime.

share|improve this answer
    
~ correct me if I'm wrong, is it like if HAS_COMPARISON is set to 0 before-compilation then the compiler eliminates block inside #else & #endif like it does for dead code elimination. –  ikis Jun 9 '13 at 7:12
    
@iKishore The preprocessor drops the code before the compiler sees it, which matters because the code that's made conditional may not compile/cause an error when the compiler sees it (e.g. due to type errors or missing functions). –  delnan Jun 9 '13 at 7:14
1  
@iKishore No, you're correct. If it's set to ANY value at all, #else is eliminated, while if the #define is removed from the code, everything from #ifdef to #else is eliminated. –  Refugnic Eternium Jun 9 '13 at 7:15
    
@RefugnicEternium it's all clear now. Thank you. :) –  ikis Jun 9 '13 at 7:19

The example you showed doesn't seem helpful due to lack of other information. But here's an example that #if is useful.

#if OS == LINUX
//do something
#elif OS == SOLARIS
//do something else
#else
//
#endif

The key is that #if is evaluated in compile time, but if is evaluated when program runs.

#if BYTE_ORDER == LITTLE_ENDIAN
//do something
#else
//do something else
#endif
share|improve this answer

The use of the preprocessor directives in this case is not entirely useful. But the use of these preprocessor directives is useful in many other cases.

These preprocessor directives can be used for conditional compilation. e.g. If some program has to be developed for multiple platforms then platform-specific constants can be given values. Changing these values compilation specific to the platform can be done while the whole code can be maintained as one big entity.

These are also useful while debugging. Test units can be compiled into the code and ran by using these conditional compilations while debugging and they can be stopped from compiling using these.

share|improve this answer

Conditional compilation means ifdef-ed out code is never actually in the final linked application. Just using language conditionals means both branches are in the final code making it bigger and potentially harder to test etc.

Use #ifdef etc when you know at compile time what is required. Language conditionals are used when you don't know what you need until runtime.

share|improve this answer

benefits of preprocessor is that the code gets thrown out. It doesn't get compiled (which takes time) and it doesn't generate machine code which will be loaded into ram. If the decision is in a VERY tight loop run LOTS of times, there could be a speed improvement. Don't assume this is important unless you actually time it, though.

The detriments of preprocessor is that you obviously have to know the answer at compile time. The source code now contains a lot of code that may not ever be executed. It becomes harder to trace for a human because it's often difficult to determine what those compile-time values would have been.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, if the condition is a compile-time constant (and simple enough that the preprocessor is an option) the compiler is usually able to infer that and remove the dead code if it's tested with if. –  delnan Jun 9 '13 at 7:08
    
True enough. It's always good to keep in mind how smart compilers are. People often write confusing code to try to do some premature optimization and then realize they've not made it faster and it's harder to read/maintain as well. –  xaxxon Jun 9 '13 at 7:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.