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assume you have a class which has methods using T. And you also have standard methods of the same name.

What happens if T is of the same type as the standard method? The standard method is called.

Is there any way to force him to call the T-method anyway?

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Generics<Int32> anInt = new Generics<Int32>(4);
        Generics<String> aString = new Generics<String>("test");
    }
}

public class Generics<T>
{
    public T Member;

    public String ErrorMessage;

    public Generics(T member)
    {
        this.Member = member;
    }

    public Generics(String errorMessage)
    {
        this.ErrorMessage = errorMessage;
    }
}
}
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2  
Did you check this out? –  sq33G Jun 9 '13 at 7:45
    
If you know that a method of same name already exists you should rename your method, imagine another programmer inheriting your code. –  Sayse Jun 9 '13 at 9:07
    
Thanks, sq33G, now I understand how to circumvent it. I my case I went a bit differently. I derived from Generics<String> and wrote me constructors that correctly handle it. –  Dee J. Doena Jun 9 '13 at 10:41
    
@Sayse It's a constructor, renaming isn't exactly an option. ;) –  Dee J. Doena Jun 9 '13 at 10:42
2  
Do not make types that unify methods under generic construction like this. Originally this was going to be made illegal in version 2. Its a bad practice that leads to implementation defined behavior. –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '13 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

Sorry, there is not.

The simplest solution is to use two different method names to indicate the difference in behaviour. Since the method names in question are constructors, you have no control over the names, so you must change at least one of them into a normal method instead. For example:

public class Generics<T>
{
    public T Member;

    public String ErrorMessage;

    public Generics(T member)
    {
        this.Member = member;
    }

    private Generics()
    {
        // empty constructor just to allow the class to create itself internally
    }

    public static Generics<T> FromError(String errorMessage)
    {
        return new Generics<T> { ErrorMessage = errorMessage };
    }
}

Personally I would change both constructors to be static methods, so that the difference in behaviour is made absolutely clear to the user. However, if you only change one constructor, make it the error one.

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Okay, I'll make my comment into an answer.

First of all, DO NOT do this. DO NOT. You want humans to be able to read your code, not just computers. (There, I've done my duty as a member of the C# programmer space)

Second.

As described here:

If you design your code so that the compiler cannot tell when it's compiling what type you're calling with, you can force it to use the generic method.

static Generics<T> Test<T> (T parameterToTest) {
    return new Generics<T>(parameterToTest);
}

static void Main()
{
    Generics<Int32> anInt = Test<Int32>(4);
    Generics<String> aString = Test<String>("test");
}
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I simply did this (for this specific case):

I added an empty protected constructor to Generics

    protected Generics() { }

And then I derived for the specific case of T = string

    public class GenericsOfString : Generics<String>
    {
        public GenericsOfString(String text, Boolean isErrorMessage)
        {
            if (isErrorMessage)
            {
                this.ErrorMessage = text;
            }
            else
            {
                this.Member = text;
            }
        }
    }
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