Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my website, i have a div with links and a div where i display the contents of the pages when corresponding link is clicked. Now i have a form which on submitting mails the data using mail() and displays that message is sent if mail() is successful. But the issue is that on submit, it sends the data and loads the page submit.php in the window. Instead of that i want the result to be shown in my contents div only.

I have browsed the net for the answer and found a lot of solutions, all using different ways.

I want to know which is the best way to do that.. which is most efficient?

note:the solutions i got were:

1) to make a ajax call jquery submit form and then show results in an existing div

2)making xmlHTTPheader request using javascript Submit form values to a script without loading a new page

3)using success handler and javascript show div on form submit with no redirect

4) make another redirect on the php script to the website

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Quentin, Benjamin Gruenbaum, Harry, Andrew, Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 12 '13 at 5:17

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What obout setting the form action to your current page, and load the php function in that page? –  veelen Jun 9 '13 at 11:45
2  
The solutions you got were: 1. Use Ajax. 2. Use Ajax. 3. Use Ajax. 4. No idea what that is supposed to mean. There isn't a whole lot to choose between them. –  Quentin Jun 9 '13 at 11:46
add comment

3 Answers

hy Aman ... try this ..

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
$("#bt_sn").click(function(e) {
    var to=$("#to").val();
    var from=$("#from").val();
    var message=$("#message");
    //AJAX begins here
    $.post("mail.php",{to_rec:to,from_rec:from,message_rec:message},function(data)
    {
        if(data=="SUC")
        {
            $("#result").html("Your mail has being sent successfully");
        }
        if(data=="FAI")
        {
            $("#result").html("Sending failed");
        }
    });



    });
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="text" id="to" />
<input type="text" id="from" />
<textarea id="message">
<button id="bt_sn" >Send</button>

Send

</body>
</html>

Now at php side ...

<?php
$to=$_POST['to_rec'];
$from=$_POST['from_rec'];
$message=$_POST['message_rec'];
// Now use these variables in your mailing section
//Now if mailing is succedd at some part just echo the success or failure
if(mailed)
echo "SUC";
else
echo "FAI"
?>

Best of luck :P :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would go for AJAX, it's te most widely used way to send new requests to your webserver without reloading the page.

share|improve this answer
add comment

1), 2), 3) are all the same thing. The word 'header' doesn't even appear in link 2). 'ajax' is a nickname for an XMLHttpRequest....(a synchronous) (ja vascript) (X MLHttpRequest).

XMLHttpRequest = ajax = all of jQuery's various methods for making an XMLHttpRequest

Asynchronous means that the user doesn't have to sit and wait for the ajax request to finish before doing other things on the page. The request will execute at the same time the user is doing other things. On the other hand, if you let the submit go through, the user can't do anything until the page reloads.

I don't understand 4). Do you mean let the submit go through then reload another page that is exactly the same as the current page but with the mail message displayed?

share|improve this answer
    
yes i mean that only –  Aman Gupta Jun 9 '13 at 11:50
    
Okay, use jquery to make an ajax request--jquery handles all the differences in the various browsers for you. I don't think it matters efficiency wise: you will make one request either way. An ajax request does allow the user to continue doing other things while the results are fetched. –  7stud Jun 9 '13 at 11:55
    
ok thanks... i have never used jquery so i was quite a lot confused about it... Thanks for the explanation. I will try that. –  Aman Gupta Jun 9 '13 at 11:59
    
jQuery is just javascript. Someone wrote a bunch of fancy functions in javascript, and they called the collection of functions jQuery. The nice thing is that the functions handle all the cross browser issues for you. –  7stud Jun 9 '13 at 12:01
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.