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I need a regex that matches the following (the brackets indicate I want to match this section, they are not there in the actual string to be matched!):

More Words:
    6818 [some words]       641 [even more words]

I tried it with following:

(?<=[0-9]+\s)[a-z\s]+(?!\s{2,})

To say it in literals; "Match all words including the whitespace between them that come one space after 1 or more digits and before 2 or more whitespaces" but it selects all whitespaces as well as it sometimes strips out the last letter of a word (wtf?)

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so what should be your final output? –  ghostdog74 Nov 9 '09 at 13:25
    
Many regex implementations do not support look-behinds that have no obvious length, or even a variable length, so chances are the the [0-9]+ inside (?<=[0-9]+\s) is illegal. So, my question (besides the one ghostdog already asked): what language are you using? –  Bart Kiers Nov 9 '09 at 13:27
    
Sorry, forgot that. I'm using C# which according to wiki and it's own documentation supports both, look-behind and look-aheads. My final output should be the parts marked with [] in the example above. (Of course the brackets are not included, would be too easy then, eh? :( ) –  Florian Peschka Nov 9 '09 at 13:33
    
I didn't question whether it would support look behinds, but look-behinds that support "variable-widths" inside them. I'm not sure if C# supports that. –  Bart Kiers Nov 9 '09 at 13:44

3 Answers 3

this works for me

[0-9]+\s([a-z \s]+)\s\s
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Works fine, I had that one also at first, but it selects also all following whitespaces after the last word. –  Florian Peschka Nov 9 '09 at 13:42
    
@ApoY2k, Just grab what is matched in group 1. –  Bart Kiers Nov 9 '09 at 13:49

try

(?<=[0-9]+\s)([a-z]+\s)*[a-z]+(?!\s{2,})

@Bart: I removed the brackets.

Explanation: This will select all words followed by a single whitespace (if they exist) plus the last word not followed by a whitespace (which is mandatory)

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Many regex implementations do not support look-behinds that have no obvious length, or even a variable length, so chances are the the [0-9]+ inside (?<=[0-9]+\s) is illegal. –  Bart Kiers Nov 9 '09 at 13:31
    
Works quite well, but now I get the strange behaviour, that sometimes the last letter of a word isn't selected, e.g.: [some word]s and [even more word]s –  Florian Peschka Nov 9 '09 at 13:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

(?<=\d\s)([a-zA-Z]+\s)*[a-zA-Z]+

This one did the trick! Don't ask how I came on that one, just fuzzing around... Still, you were a great help :)

To clarify this regex, short explanation:

1: (                open group 1
2:  ?<=\d\s         look, if a digit followed by a whitespace are before group 2
3: )                close group 1
4: (                open group 2
5:  [a-zA-Z]+\s     match any words / letters that are followed by a whitespace
6: )*               close group 2 and let it repeat or not even be there
7: [a-zA-Z]+        match any words / letters and let them repeat one or more times

long story short, the regex doesnt try to match words between an amount of whitespaces but matches anything between a digit/whitespace and a word/letter :)

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