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I have an binary array of length 64. I want to find corresponding integer in C. I have written the following code.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
main()
 {

      int A[64]={1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1,1,1},i;


       long long  int B=0;

      for(i=0;i<64;i++)
             B=B+A[i]*pow(2,63-i);

      printf("B=%llu\n",B);

  } 

Result is ok. But instead of pow function I want shift operator (<<) for efficiency. How can I do this?

share|improve this question
3  
What did you try? – ouah Jun 9 '13 at 16:37
    
declaration of i is well hidden after A's; would better be a separate declaration. – arnaud576875 Jun 9 '13 at 16:45
    
You really couldn't initialize A better? – user513638 Jun 9 '13 at 16:46
    
hint: pow(2,x) is like 1<<x (if no overflow). Not only more efficient, also more accurate. – ringø Jun 9 '13 at 16:47
    
printf("B=%llu\n",B) has undefined behavior because llu specifies unsigned long long, but B is different, long long int. Additionally, adding the high bit (2**63) and storing the result into B overflows on implementations in which long long int is 64 bits. – Eric Postpischil Jun 9 '13 at 17:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(void)
{
    int A[64] = {
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1
    };

    uint64_t B = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 64; ++i)
        B |= (uint64_t) A[i] << 63-i;

    printf("B = %" PRIu64 ".\n", B);

    return 0;
} 

Notes:

  • The type of B was changed to unsigned, notably uint64_t, to avoid overflow.
  • uint64_t was used rather than unsigned long long for clarity and precision of meaning.
  • The format specifier in the printf was matched to the type of B.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. – user12290 Jun 9 '13 at 18:30

I know this has a good answer already, but here's another version. I personally use this a part of a vertical counter implemented in c. By setting A[radix] as a bool first, it ensures that any non-zero value will be interpreted as a single bit. Just for reference on vertical counters if anyone's interested... http://www.steike.com/code/bits/vertical-counter/

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main( int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int A[64] = {
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1
    };

    uint64_t B = 0;

    for (int radix = 63; radix >= 0; radix--)
        B |= ((uint64_t)(A[radix]))<<radix;

    printf("B = %llu\n", B);
    return 0;
} 
share|improve this answer
B=B+A[i]*pow(2,63-i);

to

B=(long long)(B+A[i]*(1ULL<<(63-i)));
share|improve this answer
1  
This reverses the bits of the array from the order used by the original code. Also, there is an overflow problem, since the high bit may exceed the ranges of unsigned long long and int (but that exists in the original code as well). And there is no need for multiplication; A[i] can be shifted directly, after conversion to a suitably wide type. – Eric Postpischil Jun 9 '13 at 16:57
    
This reverses the bits sure. fixed. thanks. – BLUEPIXY Jun 9 '13 at 17:08
    
no need for multiplication I believe the contents of the array will change. – BLUEPIXY Jun 9 '13 at 17:09
    
Shifting a value does not change it any more than multiplying it would. – interjay Jun 9 '13 at 17:10
    
@interjay I have an binary array of length 64 bit 1 or 0. – BLUEPIXY Jun 9 '13 at 17:13

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