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I've been trying to get this right for over 2hrs so any help is highly appreciated

  public void setAppointment(int studentID, DateTime appt)
    {
        connection.Open();

        string sqlStatement3 = "UPDATE dbo.students SET appointmentDate = '" + appt.Date.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss") + "' WHERE ID = " + studentID + ";";

        OleDbCommand updateCommand = new OleDbCommand(sqlStatement3, connection);            
        updateCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();

        connection.Close();
    }

So basically what that does is insert a datetime into an sql server table keeping the same format of the month and day to avoid regional settings getting in the way.

The only problem is that the time remains 00:00:00. Even though when I debug the code, 'appt' shows 28/06/2013 09:30:00

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1  
SQL Injection alert - you should not concatenate together your SQL statements - use parametrized queries instead to avoid SQL injection –  marc_s Jun 9 '13 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Line 5. Change

...  appt.Date.ToString(...

to

... appt.ToString(...
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The paramaterized query as shown below is both safer and quicker. You should get into the habit of always doing this - you aren't likely to run into issues with int and datetime, but the moment you use this for a string value you are introducing SQL injection vulnerabilities. –  jedigo Jun 9 '13 at 21:17

try below

 public void setAppointment(int studentID, DateTime appt)
        {
            connection.Open();

            string sqlStatement3 = "UPDATE dbo.students SET appointmentDate = ? WHERE ID = ?";

            OleDbCommand updateCommand = new OleDbCommand(sqlStatement3, connection);
            updateCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@p1", appt);
            updateCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@p2", studentID);
            updateCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();

            connection.Close();
        }

BUT!

You say it is sql server but why you using OleDbCommand ?

try below if it is sql server

public void setAppointment(int studentID, DateTime appt)
{
    using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    using (SqlCommand cmd = con.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE dbo.students SET appointmentDate = @appointmentDate WHERE ID = @ID";
        con.Open();
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@appointmentDate", appt);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ID", studentID);
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}
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+1 that's the only safe way to do this - and yes, for SQL Server, it makes a lot more sense to use SqlConnection / SqlCommand rather than the OleDb stuff.... –  marc_s Jun 9 '13 at 20:22

I hope you have solved your problem from previous post and I agree SQL Statements to be used with parameters.

If you have an application date time format is fixed, then there is no harm in hard-coding but it would be good code to get date time format from your web.config file. This will help your code to be same consistent overall project.

Instead of

ToString("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss")

ToString(ConfigValue)

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