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Looking back at the two star programming article I can't help but fail to see the significance of the difference between the following two lines:

*curr = entry->next;
curr = &entry->next;

The only difference I can see is that the first line changes *curr to point to the next node, and the second line makes a brand new ** pointing to the node member (which is the previous node in the next loop)

It occurs to me that freeing the entry in the first if block would stop the second line from working properly next loop, but in that case why not just use the first line in both cases? Is it a performance question?

Edit: Please read the second code block in the link above titled "Two star programming"

Edit: So I appear to have explained this poorly (Sorry!) so let me see if I can explain it a bit more verbose.

This is the source code in the article.

void remove_if(node ** head, remove_fn rm)
{
    for (node** curr = head; *curr; )
    {
        node * entry = *curr;
        if (rm(entry))
        {
            *curr = entry->next;
            free(entry);
        }
        else
            curr = &entry->next;
    }
}

By my reckoning the curr = &entry->next; line isn't necessary, you could use the other twice:

void remove_if(node ** head, remove_fn rm)
{
    for (node** curr = head; *curr; )
    {
        node * entry = *curr;
        if (rm(entry))
        {
            *curr = entry->next;
            free(entry);
        }
        else
            *curr = entry->next;
    }
}

Then you could move it above the if statement and save yourself a few lines:

void remove_if(node ** head, remove_fn rm)
{
    for (node** curr = head; *curr; )
    {
        node * entry = *curr;
        *curr = entry->next;
        if (rm(entry))
        {
            free(entry);
        }
    }
}

In fact it looks like you don't need a pointer pointer at all and can do this:

void remove_if(node * head, remove_fn rm)
{
    for (node* curr = head; curr; )
    {
        node * entry = curr;
        curr = entry->next;
        if (rm(entry))
        {
            free(entry);
        }
    }
}

So why did they do it the first way? Performance? Something else obscure?

share|improve this question
5  
There's a massive difference; the first modifies the value of the thing currently being pointed at; the second modifies which thing is being pointed at. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 9 '13 at 20:40
    
*curr = entry->next; dereferences curr and puts entry->next to the memory pointed to by it. curr = &entry->next loads the address of entry->next into a pointer. That's a huge difference. –  user529758 Jun 9 '13 at 20:40
1  
The two lines do two completely different things. You'll need to show us how they're being used. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 9 '13 at 20:41
    
curr is a ** as shown in the link at the top of the question. (second code block titled "Two star programming") –  J V Jun 9 '13 at 20:41
    
Are you really asking the general question, or do you just want help understanding the article you linked to? –  David Heffernan Jun 9 '13 at 21:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code in the article is correct, and all three of your proposed variants are not correct. Let's look at the correct code first, with some annotations:

void remove_if(node ** head, remove_fn rm)
{
    // node ** passed to allow use to modify caller's head pointer
    for (node** curr = head; *curr; )
    {
        // curr is a local variable, that points to a node pointer
        // curr points either to the caller's head pointer, or to 
        // a next pointer within the list
        node * entry = *curr;
        if (rm(entry))
        {
            // remove this entry, which means modifying the list
            *curr = entry->next;
            // modify *curr modifies either caller's head pointer
            // or a next pointer
            free(entry);
        }
        else
            // did not remove, so do not modify the list
            curr = &entry->next;
    }
}

The key points to note here:

  • *curr = entry->next modifies the list.
  • curr = &entry->next does not modify the list.

Your first two proposed versions are wrong because they do

*curr = entry->next

at every iteration. Assigning to *curr modifies the list. Imagine a scenario where rm() always returned false. In that case you must never modify the list, but you modify it every time round the loop.

And the final variant is wrong in because you are only passing in a node * then there's no way for the caller's head pointer to be modified. In fact, the final variant does not modify the list at all.

share|improve this answer

The two are completely different.

curr = &entry->next;

takes the address of the variable entry->next, and assigns it to the pointer variable curr. After this assignment, whatever curr was previously pointing to will not have changed, but will have one fewer reference to it.

*curr = entry->next;

Does not change the value of curr at all, but changes the value of whatever it pointed to, which will have the same number of references as before but a different value.

Yes, both of these will have as one effect that *curr will be equal to entry->next, but they in fact write different values to different memory locations and have other side effects that matter.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 the last paragraph sums it up. –  morningstar Jun 9 '13 at 20:49
    
Right, but why not just use the second line (in your answer) in both cases? The first (in your answer) won't work when entry is free()d, but from what I can tell the other should work both times. –  J V Jun 9 '13 at 20:50
1  
Well, if they do different things, one is correct and one isn't. Which is which depends on what you're trying to do. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Jun 9 '13 at 21:33
    
Well that's the thing, they don't. *curr = entry->next could replace curr = &entry->next with no effects (Or sit outside the if statement altogether) but it wouldn't work the other way around. So why did they do the other one at all? edit: Actually now that I think about it you don't strictly need ** at all here, it could be accomplished with a single pointer. So why do they use **? –  J V Jun 9 '13 at 21:38
1  
@JV *curr = entry->next actually writes to what curr is pointing to - it doesn't change curr. curr = &entry->next changes curr. How can they replace eachother ? The use of double pointers here is to ease the code that manipulates the linked list. If you do it without double pointers, you need to save the previous node, you need to specifically check if the node you're inserting/deleting is the head of the linked-list and so on. Your last suggestion in the question doesn't change the linked list at all, it just assigns local variables within the function. –  nos Jun 9 '13 at 21:52

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