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The old way:

var self = this;    
setTimeout(function(){
  console.log(self);
}, 5000);

With jQuery:

setTimeout($.proxy(function(){
  console.log(this);
}, this), 5000);

With bind:

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).bind(this), 5000);

With call:

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).call(this), 5000);

It seems that apply works too:

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).apply(this), 5000);

http://jsfiddle.net/SYajz/1/

I was wondering if there are any not so obvious differences between these methods

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your last two examples don't work - they invoke the callback immediately. –  Alnitak Jun 9 '13 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Right, so we've got three styles of calling a function here. They are all ways of addressing the problem of context, i.e. that the this keyword will have a different value depending on how the function is called.

Aliasing

var self = this;    
setTimeout(function(){
  console.log(self);
}, 5000);

This is a very simple way. It simply sets a new variable that won't be overridden within the function. The value is closed in, so when the function is called after the timeout, self will be what you expect.

Binding

setTimeout($.proxy(function(){
  console.log(this);
}, this), 5000);

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).bind(this), 5000);

These two functions have identical results. This is because $.proxy does exactly the same thing as bind. bind, however, is a new syntax that isn't supported by some older browsers.

This works by permanently "binding" a context to a function. This means that, however the function is called, the value of this will always be the value of the first argument to bind.

call/apply

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).call(this), 5000);

setTimeout((function(){
  console.log(this);
}).apply(this), 5000);

Again, these two functions are identical. The only difference between call and apply is what other parameters are sent to a function. call expects a list (e.g. fn.call(context, param1, param2)) whereas apply expects an array (fn.apply(context, [param1, param2])).

What both these functions do is call the function with a particular context specified.

However, neither of these functions does what you want. They both call the function immediately with a certain context, rather than waiting 5 seconds to do so. That's because call and apply work just like (): the code is executed immediately.

Conclusion

Which method is more suitable will depend on your task. For simple operations, aliasing might well do the job. But it's worth remembering that that introduces another variable, and that the context can't be set at call-time. The other methods also have their strengths in different situations, particularly when writing a library where users are supplying callback functions.

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With $.proxy and .bind(), you're creating a new function that has its this value bound to the value you provided. So that's the function that gets passed to setTimeout().


With .call() and .apply() you're invoking the function immediately, so it's not going to wait for the timer.

For those to work with the timer, you'd need to return a function that closes over a variable that references the provided this value, and invokes the console.log() given the referenced this.

setTimeout((function(){
  var that = this;
  return function() {
      console.log(that);
  }
}).call(this), 5000);
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