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I have succesed to make my animation where i'm changing the size of the div´s with a setTimeout. The problem is, that i can't find a way for them to loop, i´ve tried to call to start() function within the function itself, but after the first execution, the animation gets really messy. Can someone help me with making the whole sequence loop without any trouble?

$(document).ready(function () {
    alert('Sådan!');
});


function div1ind() {
    $(function () {
        $('#div1').css({
            'z-index': 2
        })
    });

    $(function () {
        $('#div1').animate({
            height: '1080px',
            width: '1918px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);
    });

}

function div1ud() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div1').animate({
            height: '540px',
            width: '959px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);

    });



    $(function () {
        $('#div1').css({
            'z-index': 1
        })
    });
}

function div2ind() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div2').css({
            'z-index': 2
        })
    });

    $(function () {
        $('#div2').animate({
            height: '1080px',
            width: '1918px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);
    });


}



function div2ud() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div2').animate({
            height: '540px',
            width: '959px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '959px'
        }, 500);

    });


    $(function () {
        $('#div2').css({
            'z-index': 1
        })
    });
}

function div3ind() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div3').css({
            'z-index': 2
        })
    });

    $(function () {
        $('#div3').animate({
            height: '1080px',
            width: '1918px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);
    });

}

function div3ud() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div3').animate({
            height: '540px',
            width: '959px',
            top: '540px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);

    });

    $(function () {
        $('#div3').css({
            'z-index': 1
        })
    });
}

function div4ind() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div4').css({
            'z-index': 2
        })
    });

    $(function () {
        $('#div4').animate({
            height: '1080px',
            width: '1918px',
            top: '0px',
            left: '0px'
        }, 500);
    });
}

function div4ud() {

    $(function () {
        $('#div4').animate({
            height: '540px',
            width: '959px',
            top: '540px',
            left: '959px'
        }, 500);

    });


    $(function () {
        $('#div4').css({
            'z-index': 1
        })
    });
}

function start() {

    $(function () {
        setTimeout('div1ind()', 2000);
        setTimeout('div1ud()', 4000);
        setTimeout('div2ind()', 6000);
        setTimeout('div2ud()', 8000);
        setTimeout('div3ind()', 10000);
        setTimeout('div3ud()', 12000);
        setTimeout('div4ind()', 14000);
        setTimeout('div4ud()', 16000);
    });
}

start();
share|improve this question
    
Use setInterval(). – Mooseman Jun 9 '13 at 22:30
1  
you don't need to use $(function(){ to wrap every function. Use it once and wrap everything – Spokey Jun 9 '13 at 22:31
    
Then the functions will all execute at once, and i dont want that. That why seperated them and used setTimeout, does that make sense...? Im a bit new to jquery... – Schira Jun 9 '13 at 22:40
    
If i use setInterval, then i can loop them yes, but how can i plan the order and time between my functions at the same time...? – Schira Jun 9 '13 at 22:44
    
@user2469206 $(function () { stands for $(document).ready(function () { so they will all run when the DOM is ready. – Spokey Jun 9 '13 at 22:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a better case for setInterval, so as to prevent race conditions with multiple timeout instances.

The added benefit to a solution like this is that you can easily add or remove function calls to your list without reprogramming and double-checking all the timeouts.

What I'm doing here is creating an array that maps to your other functions, and then setting an interval that will trigger every 2 seconds. The interval increments the value of i, and calls the function that is the modulus of i % x (where x is the number of functions in your list).

(Edit: tweaked the code to be neater. Edit 2: wrapped in an anonymous function to prevent calling the same index.)

var i = 0;
var function_map = [div1ind, div1ud, div2ind, div2ud, div3ind, div3ud, div4in, div4ud];    
window.setInterval(function() {
    function_map[i++ % function_map.length]()
}, 2000);

EDIT: Per your comment below, if you want them to have different delays, you could do this (add the timeout into the function map and build a recursive timeout chain):

var i = 0;
var function_map = [
    [1000,div1ind], 
    [2000,div1ud], 
    [3000,div2ind], 
    [2000,div2ud], 
    [5000,div3ind], 
    [3000,div3ud], 
    [4000,div4in], 
    [2000,div4ud]
];
function start() {    
    var func = function_map[i++ % function_map.length];
    window.setTimeout(function() {
        func[1]();
        start();
    }, func[0]);
}
start();
share|improve this answer
1  
There can't be any multiple threads, as Javascript is strictly single threaded. Every event is handled in the same thread. – Guffa Jun 9 '13 at 23:25
    
An interval waits for each process to complete before sleeping and beginning the next in the chain. A series of timeouts does not function the same way. Each timeout is independent of the others, and thus functions similarly to a series of threads, regardless of the fact that JS is single-threaded. – Steven Moseley Jun 9 '13 at 23:28
    
There can only be one event handler running at a time, so how would a timeout not wait for the previous handler to complete? – Guffa Jun 10 '13 at 0:02
    
Run this and you'll see what I mean. It waits while the loop executes, then logs 1 and 2 one immediately after the other. function test1() {for (i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {/* wait */} console.log('1');} function test2() {console.log('2');} setTimeout(test1, 1000); setTimeout(test2, 2000); – Steven Moseley Jun 10 '13 at 0:10
    
An interval, on the other hand, would maintain a n second interval between the two function calls. – Steven Moseley Jun 10 '13 at 0:11

Your setTimeout calls makes the functions start at different times, so make another that makes the start function start again:

function start() {
  setTimeout(div1ind, 2000);
  setTimeout(div1ud, 4000);
  setTimeout(div2ind, 6000);
  setTimeout(div2ud, 8000);
  setTimeout(div3ind, 10000);
  setTimeout(div3ud, 12000);
  setTimeout(div4ind, 14000);
  setTimeout(div4ud, 16000);
  setTimeout(start, 18000);
}

Don't use $(function(){ ... }) everywhere, that is a shorthand for $.ready(function(){ ... }), i.e. it would bind the ready event. However, if you do that after the ready event has occured, jQuery will just call the callback immediately, so it's just useless code.

Bind the ready event once to start the start function, and remove that extra wrappers from all your functions. Instead of:

start();

use this to use the start function as callback for the ready event handler:

$(start);

or the equivalent:

$(document).ready(start);
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work as intended. You'll get a 4 second delay at the end, instead of a 2 second delay. Better to use interval to prevent race conditions, anyway. – Steven Moseley Jun 9 '13 at 23:16
    
@StevenMoseley: Just adjust the time to get the intended effect. Regarding race conditions, as Javscript is strictly single threaded, there can never ever be any multiple threads. – Guffa Jun 9 '13 at 23:24
    
Each timeout operates on its own timer. Even though they're operating in a single thread, if one of the timeout callbacks takes longer, you'll get inconsistent intervals in between each timeout. Not a true race condition, but the effect is similar. – Steven Moseley Jun 9 '13 at 23:25
1  
@StevenMoseley: Timing isn't exact, but how do you think using setInterval instead of setTimeout would make that any better? – Guffa Jun 9 '13 at 23:27

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