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My intention here is just to fill up an array with numbers in order from 1, to a random number between 1 and 1000. However, after repeatedly running this code (about 50 times), the highest number I have gotten is 120, and only twice has it been over 100. The majority of my arrays were anywhere between 0 and 60. This behavior appears off to me. Am I doing something wrong?

my_array = []
i = 0
while i <= rand(1000)
    my_array << i 
    i += 1  
end

puts my_array.count
puts my_array
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Are you seeding your randomizer? –  Narfanator Jun 10 '13 at 4:14
    
You're random number is the guard in the while loop and you are appending what you thought to be the counter. –  squiguy Jun 10 '13 at 4:15
    
After looking at my code... does this run a new random number every time it loops? If so, that would explain why it leans so heavily toward smaller numbers. I am going to check and then report back if no one has answered yet. –  DudeDiligence Jun 10 '13 at 4:16
    
I would expect rand(1000) to be evaluated every time the conditional is evaluated. –  Narfanator Jun 10 '13 at 4:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your function is broken, because you're checking versus the random number. Do this:

(0..1000).collect{ rand(1000) }

This will return an array of one thousand random numbers.

Or, closer to your code:

my_array = []
i = 0
while i <= 1000
    my_array << rand(1000) 
    i += 1  
end

As per comment, what you want is:

(1..rand(1000))

(1..rand(1000)).to_a

The first results in a range, which is "easier to carry around", the second results in the populated array.

(Edit) Note:

(1..10) is inclusive - (1..10).to_a == [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

(1...10) is partially exclusive - (1...10).to_a == [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9] - it does not include the end of the array, but still includes the beginning.

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Thanks. I was actually trying to get an array from 1 to some random number between 1 and 1000, in sequential order. –  DudeDiligence Jun 10 '13 at 4:20
    
@Kewigro There is no order with random. If you want it sequential, you'll have to sort it after. –  squiguy Jun 10 '13 at 4:22
    
In Ruby, you are generally describing what you want, rather than the recipe for getting it. What you want is an array from 1 to a random number, so that's what you write. –  Narfanator Jun 10 '13 at 4:23
    
Okay. I'm just learning ruby. Your examples helped to highlight the mistake I was making, which i had suspected but wasn't sure how to fix. Thanks –  DudeDiligence Jun 10 '13 at 4:26

It sounds like you want:

(1...rand(1000)).to_a
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Or even without #to_a. For most applications things that include Enumerable are as good as arrays. –  samuil Jun 10 '13 at 8:58
    
Ok but OP specifically asked for an array. –  pguardiario Jun 10 '13 at 9:34

Additionally, I have amended my code to reflect what I was trying to accomplish initially. My problem was that every time I looped through my code I generated a new random number. Because of this, as 'i' incremented toward 1000 it became more and more likely that a random number would be generated that was lower than 'i'. My fix, while not as elegant as the solution above that I accepted, was to store the random number in a variable, BEFORE attempting to use it in a loop. Thanks again. Here is the amended code:

my_array = []
i = 0
g = rand(1000)
while i <= g
    my_array << i 
    i += 1  
end

puts my_array.count
puts my_array
share|improve this answer
1  
You could do this less verbosely as my_array = (1..g).to_a –  Frederick Cheung Jun 10 '13 at 7:15
    
Yes, that looks very nice. I will use that instead from now on. –  DudeDiligence Jun 10 '13 at 17:34

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