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.NET framework 3.5 introduces Action and Func<> predefined delegate types that are very handy. Is it any way to conditionally add such delegates into my sources so they will compile for both .NET 2.0 and .NET 3.5 without name conflicts? Something like #if not defined( Action ) public delegate void Action(); r #if TARGET_FRAMEWORK < 3.5 public delegate void Action();

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There is no C# 3.5 - Action and Func<> are types in .Net 3.5 framework. C# 3.0 has some syntax (such as var and lambdas) to aid in the usage of these types. –  David B Nov 9 '09 at 15:45
    
Thanks for comment, i have edited a question to clarify it. –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you redefine your Action and Func delegates, they will be in a different namespace and therefore not conflict with anything from .Net 3.5. They'll have the same simple name, signature, and purpose, but the fully qualified name with be different. So no conficts, and no PreProcessor directives needed.

The only caveat is that they will be different from the Action and Func types defined in .Net 3.5. They will work exactly the same. They'll just be different types. This could get you into trouble if you want to call a 3.5 BCL method that takes the original Action type, for example, but since you're shooting for 2.0 compatibility that just shouldn't happen.

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But i wll need to use a full qualified name for them, right? If i used both using System; using MyDelegateTypes; that will result in name conflict if compiled with .NET 3.5 target? Or not? –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:49
    
No. Action and Func are in the base System namespace, but they are actually defined in the System.Core assembly, which you shouldn't be loading as that would cause problems for the 2.0 compilation. –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 9 '09 at 15:54
    
I have just compiled a test code that has only using System; and using MyDelegates;. It gives compilation error about name conflict between System.Action and MyDelegates.Action :( –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:58
    
Ah, you means System.Core ASSEMBLY! Yes, it works! After removing it from references all compiles fine. Thanks a lot! –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 16:00

If you do a "Go to Definition" in VS on an Action<> or Func<> declaraion, you will see how to declare them. For example Action is declared like this:

public delegate void Action<T>(T obj);

Edit: to check the version of .NET i don't think there's anything predefined. However, you can define a build configuration for each target version and define a symbol there.

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I know. But i need a way to declare them only for C#2.0 so if my code is compiled in c#3.5 where will be no name conflicts. –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:42

I couldn't find a predefined preprocessor variable for you to use, but you can easily set one up in the project properties (in the Build tab). You can switch that flag to whatever you want before building when you switch the version of .NET that you compile against.

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Yes, this sounds like a kind of solution and i will use it if nothing better is found. But such things as specific preprocessor variables for specific build lead to build process complication. Not a very good thing to do :(. –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:52

Try this:

Open your project, right click on your project in the solution explorer, navigate tot he Build tab, add CSHARP2 in the conditional compilation symbols textbox.

Declare a class called CSharpExtensions.cs:

namespace System
{
#if CSHARP2
    public delegate void Action();
    public delegate void Action<T>(T t);
    public delegate void Action<T, U>(T t, U u);
    public delegate void Action<T, U, V>(T t, U u, V v);
    public delegate TResult Func<TResult>();
    public delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T t);
    public delegate TResult Func<T, U, TResult>(T t, U u);
    public delegate TResult Func<T, U, V, TResult>(T t, U u, V v);
#endif
}

Assuming you compile under 3.5 without defining the CSHARP2 symbol, you should be able to use your functions above as expected:

using System; // includes our new delegates
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static IEnumerable<U> Map<T, U>(IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, U> f)
        {
            foreach (T t in input)
            {
                yield return f(t);
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] numbers = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
            foreach(String s in Map<int, string>(numbers, delegate(int i) { return String.Format("{0}^2 = {1}", i, i*i); }))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(s);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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2  
This is .NET 2.0, not C# 2.0, so naming it CSHARP2 is very misleading. –  Sam Harwell Nov 9 '09 at 16:07

I've used this with great success. Define FOR_DOTNET2 when you are building the project ... for .NET 2.0. Even better, you can copy the summary comments over from MSDN and put them in XML format.

#if FOR_DOTNET2
namespace System
{
    public delegate void Action<T>(T arg);
}
#endif
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You could add them as local to the class where you need them.

public class MyClass
{
    // These were not added until .Net 3.5
    public delegate void Action();
    public delegate TResult Func<TResult>();
    public delegate TResult Func<TResult,T>(T arg);
    public delegate TResult Func<TResult,T1, T2>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2);

    public void DoSomething(Func<int> callback) {
        ...
    }
}
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Adding them to all classes is a lot of code :(. Maybe it's some #if derective exists that allows to defined them only if they are not already defined? Something like #if not defined( Func ) ... or #if COMPILER_VERSION < 3.5 ... –  Eye of Hell Nov 9 '09 at 15:43

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