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I want to loop over the elements of an HTML form, and store the values of the <input> fields in an object. The following code doesn't work, though:

function config() {
    $("#frmMain").children().map(function() {
        var child = $("this");
        if (child.is(":checkbox"))
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.attr("checked");
        if (child.is(":radio, checked"))
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.val();
        if (child.is(":text"))
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.val();
        return null;
    });

Neither does the following (inspired by jobscry's answer):

function config() {
    $("#frmMain").children().each(function() {
        var child = $("this");
        alert(child.length);
        if (child.is(":checkbox")) {
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.attr("checked");
        }
        if (child.is(":radio, checked"))
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.val();
        if (child.is(":text"))
            this[child.attr("name")] = child.val();
    });
}

The alert always shows that child.length == 0. Manually selecting the elements works:

    
>>> $("#frmMain").children()
Object length=42
>>> $("#frmMain").children().filter(":checkbox")
Object length=3

Any hints on how to do the loop correctly?

share|improve this question
    
Your thread just saved me 20 minutes of line by line input fields for multiple forms -_-;. +1. –  zeboidlund Nov 28 '11 at 18:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 40 down vote accepted

don't think you need quotations on this:

var child = $("this");

try:

var child = $(this);
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2  
Wow good catch - I didn't notice that –  Hugoware Oct 4 '08 at 12:53
    
Thanks! It's working for me now. –  Christian Aichinger Oct 4 '08 at 13:09

jQuery has an excellent function for looping through a set of elements: .each()

$('#formId').children().each(
    function(){
        //access to form element via $(this)
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for me, see my edit of the question. Further ideas? –  Christian Aichinger Oct 4 '08 at 12:23
    
The form will likely have a paragraph or something similar as its child. You need to make sure you only select input elements. –  SpoonMeiser Oct 4 '08 at 18:00
    
"children()" gets all of the DOM children within the form, not the elements. –  mpemburn Nov 1 '13 at 14:13

Depending on what you need each child for (if you're looking to post it somewhere via AJAX) you can just do...

$("#formID").serialize()

It creates a string for you with all of the values automatically.

As for looping through objects, you can also do this.

$.each($("input, select, textarea"), function(i,v) {
    var theTag = v.tagName;
    var theElement = $(v);
    var theValue = theElement.val();
});
share|improve this answer

I have used the following before:

var my_form = $('#form-id');
var data = {};

$('input:not([type=checkbox]), input[type=checkbox]:selected, select, textarea', my_form).each(
    function() {
        var name = $(this).attr('name');
        var val = $(this).val();

        if (!data.hasOwnProperty(name)) {
            data[name] = new Array;
        }

        data[name].push(val);
    }
);

This is just written from memory, so might contain mistakes, but this should make an object called data that contains the values for all your inputs.

Note that you have to deal with checkboxes in a special way, to avoid getting the values of unchecked checkboxes. The same is probably true of radio inputs.

Also note using arrays for storing the values, as for one input name, you might have values from several inputs (checkboxes in particular).

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Why are you writing $(this) twice....why not cache the lookup –  redsquare Oct 9 '08 at 13:34
2  
Did you vote me down for that? $(this) isn't a lookup, you're wrapping an existing object with a jQuery object. It might be slightly more efficient to only do this once, but the difference will be marginal. –  SpoonMeiser Oct 9 '08 at 13:59
    
Out of all of the many suggestions I've seen, this is the easiest to implement. Thanks! –  mpemburn Nov 1 '13 at 14:58

if you want to use the each function, it should look like this:

$('#formId').children().each( 
  function(){
    //access to form element via $(this)
  }
);

Just switch out the closing curly bracket for a close paren. Thanks for pointing it out, jobscry, you saved me some time.

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Why did you post this as an answer when you say you're just replying to jobscry? It's the same code he posted. That is what comments are for. –  Shane Reustle Oct 23 '10 at 18:52

for me all these didn't work. What worked for me was something really simple:

$("#formID input[type=text]").each(function() {
alert($(this).val());
});
share|improve this answer

This is the simplest way to loop through a form accessing only the form elements. Inside the each function you can check and build whatever you want. When building objects note that you will want to declare it outside of the each function.

EDIT JSFIDDLE

The below will work

$('form[name=formName]').find('input, textarea, select').each(function() {
    alert($(this).attr('name'));
});
share|improve this answer
    
$('#formId input, select, textarea') will return all input elements in the form, along with every select box and textarea in the page. –  cHao Mar 26 '13 at 20:22
    
It actually doent behave like that... Using that exact format in JSFiddle actually resulted in only the select and textarea echoing. Adding a comma in front of 'input' results it what you are saying. –  Scottzozer Mar 27 '13 at 12:17
    
Really? Cause jsfiddle.net/UDD7E/3 shows exactly what i was talking about. Both select boxes and both textareas are red, even though one of each is outside the form. –  cHao Mar 27 '13 at 14:19
    
Interesting, I got different results. Maybe it is because I launched it on a button click. Very strange. I'd throw up a fiddle but doesnt matter anymore. –  Scottzozer Mar 27 '13 at 16:59
    
Just noticed the edit. The new code should work better, as you're grabbing the form and querying it (which restricts the query in a way the other code didn't). The code above it is still broken, and you might want to get rid of it, but at least you have something that works now. :) –  cHao Apr 4 '13 at 16:10

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